Member Highlight: Stanford Researchers Develop Technology To Harness Energy From Mixing Of Freshwater And Seawater

2019-08-12T12:23:03+00:00 August 12, 2019|
(Credit: Crew and Officers of NOAA Ship FAIRWEATHER)

(Credit: Crew and Officers of NOAA Ship FAIRWEATHER)

A new battery made from affordable and durable materials generates energy from places where salt and fresh waters mingle. The technology could make coastal wastewater treatment plants energy-independent and carbon neutral.

(From Stanford University/ By Rob Jordan) — Salt is power. It might sound like alchemy, but the energy in places where salty ocean water and freshwater mingle could provide a massive source of renewable power. Stanford researchers have developed an affordable, durable technology that could harness this so-called blue energy.

The paper, recently published in American Chemical Society’s ACS Omega, describes the battery and suggests using it to make coastal wastewater treatment plants energy-independent.

“Blue energy is an immense and untapped source of renewable energy,” said study coauthor Kristian Dubrawski, a postdoctoral scholar in civil and environmental engineering at Stanford. “Our battery is a major step toward practically capturing that energy without membranes, moving parts or energy input.”

Dubrawski works in the lab of study co-author Craig Criddle, a professor of civil and environmental engineering known for interdisciplinary field projects of energy-efficient technologies. The idea of developing a battery that taps into salt gradients originated with…

Read the full article here: https://news.stanford.edu/2019/07/29/generating-energy-wastewater/