Continuing Resolution 2.0

2019-08-27T14:36:05+00:00 December 11, 2017|

(Credit: Martin Falbisoner/Wikimedia Commons) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Capitol_at_Dusk_2.jpg)] Why It Matters One of Congress’s major responsibilities is funding the federal government through the appropriations process. When this is not completed at the start of the fiscal year (October 1), it can lead to uncertainty and problems, such as delays on federal grant distribution, [...]

Assailed As Tool Of Industry, EPA Administrator Pruitt Affirms Importance Of Science

2019-08-27T14:37:57+00:00 December 11, 2017|

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt pushed back on criticism that his agency has bent to industry influence, telling a congressional committee Thursday that science remains “essential” to the promulgation of policies and regulations affecting the environment and public health. (From USA Today/ By Ledyard King) -- Several Democrats on the House Commerce and Energy Committee assailed [...]

November’s Congressional Wrap Up

2019-08-27T14:45:05+00:00 December 4, 2017|

What Passed The budget reconciliation process was used for tax reform last month in both chambers. The House passed their tax reform plan (H.R. 1) along party lines, which included provisions to impose taxes on graduate student tuition waivers and to end deductions of amount paid on student loan interest. The Senate version, which [...]

Is NOAA One Step Closer To Having An Administrator?

2019-08-27T14:46:58+00:00 December 4, 2017|

What It Was The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee held a nomination hearing to consider presidential nominee Mr. Barry Myers (CEO, AccuWeather, Inc.) to serve as the administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Why It Matters Executive leadership is vital to, implementing missions, executing projects, creating an organizational structure and ensuring employees [...]

A Less Frozen Frontier

2019-08-27T14:51:41+00:00 December 4, 2017|

What It Was A coalition of geoscience organizations and Representative Don Young (AK-At-large) hosted a briefing in the Geosciences and the U.S. Economy Series titled, “Geosciences in the Artic: Permafrost, Energy, and Trade Routes in the Last Frontier.” Why It Matters The United States is an Arctic nation with many transportation, tourism, development, technology, [...]

Climate Skeptic From Texas Moves Closer To Top Environment Post Under Trump

2019-08-27T14:52:28+00:00 November 30, 2017|

A Senate committee approved Kathleen Hartnett White, a climate change skeptic and former chairwoman of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, for a top environmental post Wednesday. Voting along party lines, the Senate’s Environment and Public Works committee approved White to head the Council on Environmental Quality. Her nomination must be approved by the full Senate before she is confirmed.

House Floor Action: NDAA and Flood Insurance Reauthorization

2019-08-27T16:01:05+00:00 November 20, 2017|

The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (NDAA, H.R. 2810) passed the House (356-70) and Senate (by voice vote) this week. The 21st Century Flood Reform Act (H.R. 2874) passed the House (237-189). Activities of the U.S. military, ranging from understanding our ocean and providing disaster relief to enforcing laws and providing medical assistance, are authorized each year by the NDAA. Many provisions relate to the safety and security of our nation and our military, making this a must-pass bill that has been passed 55 years in a row.

Tax Reform: Graduate Student Tuition And ANWR Drilling

2019-08-27T16:03:41+00:00 November 20, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) Map of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). (Credit: USGS) What It Was Both chambers worked on tax reform bills, which are advancing through the budget reconciliation process. The House’s bill, Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (H.R. 1), passed the chamber along a largely party-line vote (227-205) and includes a [...]

Diversifying The STEM Workforce

2019-08-27T16:05:08+00:00 November 20, 2017|

The House Science, Space, and Technology Committee held a markup on four science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) bills (STEM Research and Education Effectiveness and Transparency Act (H.R. 4375), Supporting Veterans in STEM Careers Act (H.R. 4323), Women in Aerospace Education Act (H.R. 4254), and Building Blocks of STEM Act (H.R. 3397)) and on three bills promoting research at the Department of Energy (Department of Energy Research Infrastructure Act of 2017 (H.R. 4376), Accelerating American Leadership in Science Act of 2017 (H.R. 4377), and Nuclear Energy Research Infrastructure Act of 2017 (H.R. 4378)). All seven bills passed out of committee by voice vote.

Drilling For The Future

2019-08-27T16:11:00+00:00 November 13, 2017|

The Strengthening the Economy with Critical Untapped Resources to Expand (SECURE) American Energy Act (H.R. 4239) was discussed in a hearing by the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources. The next day, it was marked up by the full committee, passing along a nearly party line vote (19-14).

Bridenstine Nomination Approved By Committee On Party-line Vote

2019-08-27T16:21:35+00:00 November 13, 2017|

The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee approved the nomination of Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-OK) to be NASA Administrator this morning on a party-line vote. The committee also approved Neil Jacobs to be Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and Prediction on a voice vote. The nominations next will go to the full Senate for a vote. Dates have not been announced.

Senators Tear Into Controversial Trump Environment Nominee

2019-08-27T16:20:26+00:00 November 9, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) Kathleen Hartnett White(Credit: Paul Morse/Heritage Foundation/Flickr) Senators from both parties on Wednesday criticized Kathleen Hartnett White, a key environmental nominee from President Trump, using her past statements on climate change and fuel policy to raise concerns about her nomination.  (From The Hill/ by Devin Henry) -- Hartnett White, a think tank official [...]

Questions On The Road To Confirmation

2019-08-27T16:25:07+00:00 November 6, 2017|

The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee held a hearing to consider four presidential nominees subject to Senate confirmation, including The Honorable James Bridenstine (OK-1) to be Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Dr. Neil Jacobs to be Assistant Secretary of Commerce, Environmental Observation and Prediction at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Working Together On Water

2019-08-27T16:29:45+00:00 November 6, 2017|

The House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans held a hearing on three water bills, including the Hydrographic Services Improvement Amendments Act (H.R. 221) and Keep America’s Waterfronts Working Act (H.R. 1176). The use of our ocean is increasing, and this hearing focused on two pieces of legislation that would address the backlog of coastal surveys (which could help prevent oil spills, ship collisions, and habitat destruction) and ensure working waterfronts persist through coastal development.

One Fin, Two Fin, Red Fin, No Fin

2019-08-27T16:32:03+00:00 November 6, 2017|

The House Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on Interior, Energy, and Environment held a hearing, “Examining the Regulation of Shark Finning in the United States.” There are nearly 500 species of sharks, and these top predators play a key role in maintaining ecosystem balance, which allows for thriving fisheries, robust habitats, and a healthy ocean. In turn, a healthy ocean is critical to life on this planet – from supplying oxygen and food to its role in international commerce.

October’s Congressional Wrap Up

2019-08-27T16:37:36+00:00 November 6, 2017|

Two bills in COL’s legislative tracker were signed into law this month. The timely H.R. 1117 (P.L.115-69) aims to increase reliability of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) post-disaster. It requires the agency to create a plan, which includes identifying new technologies to facilitate response partnerships between federal, state, tribal, and non-profit responders, for consistent and timely guidance during disaster response.

EPA Blocks Scientists Who Get Grants From Its Advisory Boards

2019-08-28T08:39:02+00:00 October 31, 2017|

The Trump administration rolled out a new policy Tuesday that scientists receiving Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grants cannot serve on the agency's advisory boards, a move critics said is part of a war on independent science. The policy, rolled out at an EPA event by Administrator Scott Pruitt, would shut hundreds of expert scientists working in environmental and health fields at universities from serving on the boards, and would almost certainly increase the representation from companies and industry groups.

Money Doesn’t Grow On Trees

2019-08-29T17:46:54+00:00 October 30, 2017|

NDD United, which was established after the Budget Control Act of 2011 (P.L. 112-25) created caps on spending through 2021, works to ensure nondefense discretionary (NDD) federal spending is treated on par with defense spending. NDD United held a briefing “Faces of Austerity 2.0: How Budget Cuts Continue To Make Us Sicker, Poorer, And Less Secure” in conjunction with their release of a new report with the same title.

Senators Agree Science Is Key

2019-08-28T08:46:28+00:00 October 30, 2017|

The Senate Commerce, Science, & Transportation Subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries, and Coast Guard held a hearing on the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA; P.L 109-479) reauthorization on Tuesday titled “Reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act: Fisheries Science.” The MSA, the nation’s primary law to regulate commercial and recreational fisheries, has enabled rebuilding of numerous U.S. fish stocks and decreased overfishing. Over the last 41 years, science-based management has played an increasingly important role, which should continue with this reauthorization.

Living Shorelines: Effective, Functional, And Cheap

2019-08-28T08:58:02+00:00 October 23, 2017|

The Congressional Estuary Caucus Co-Chairs, Representatives Bill Posey (FL-8), Suzanne Bonamici (OR-1), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-2), and Rick Larsen (WA-2), hosted a briefing, “Natural Infrastructure 101: What are living shorelines and how do they protect coastal communities?” More than half of the U.S. population lives in coastal areas. Urban development has contributed to the destruction of shoreline ecosystems, such as wetlands, marshes, mangroves, and coral reefs.

Research: Show Us The Value

2019-08-28T09:00:14+00:00 October 23, 2017|

The Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Federal Spending Oversight and Energy Management held a hearing, “Broken Beakers: Federal Support for Research.” Subcommittee members agreed on the importance of research and its daily benefits, but the role government should play in funding studies was split along party lines. The three main points of contention had to do with research merit, proposal selection process, and return on investment.

Ecology Lays Out Plan For Considering Pacific Shore Projects

2019-08-28T09:07:17+00:00 October 18, 2017|

The state Department of Ecology is seeking public comment on a draft plan to address how to make decisions about potential new projects along the Pacific Coast. Requests could be received for such projects as renewable energy, dredging disposal, mining, marine product harvesting, military uses and offshore aquaculture operations, Ecology said. “The Department of Ecology has been leading a state effort to plan and prepare for these potential new coastal uses,” Ecology said in a press release.

Trump Administration Science Leadership Roles Move Forward

2019-08-28T14:28:05+00:00 October 16, 2017|

On Wednesday, President Trump announced his intent to nominate Mr. Barry Myers (CEO, AccuWeather) to lead the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Several other science and technology nominations and confirmations of interest to the ocean science community also occurred. Why It Matters- As our nation recovers from extreme weather events from coast to coast, the importance of NOAA to public safety cannot be understated.

No More Marine Monuments?

2019-08-28T14:30:16+00:00 October 16, 2017|

The House Natural Resources Committee held a markup on Wednesday to consider the National Monument Creation and Protection Act (H.R. 3990) and a resolution concerning the Interior Department’s review of the Antiquities Act (H.Res. 555). The National Monument Creation and Protection Act, which passed out of committee along a party line vote (23-17) would eliminate the president’s ability to designate marine monuments and would require consent from Congress to protect large terrestrial areas. H.Res. 555, which failed along the same vote margin, would have asked Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke to provide Congress with more information about his recent report that would significantly reduce the size of at least four national monuments.

Offshore Drilling: At What Cost

2019-08-28T14:31:30+00:00 October 16, 2017|

House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources held a hearing on a discussion draft of the Accessing Strategic Resources Offshore Act (ASTRO Act) (draft bill). Why It Matters - Drilling for oil in the ocean has an impact on our economy and environment. Outer continental shelf (OCS) drilling has been banned in certain areas for several reasons, including disruption to tourism, threats to ecosystems and species, noise pollution, and risk of oil spills. Determining where OCS lease sales can occur involves rigorous assessment. This bill would open all areas of the ocean to drilling, eliminate the president’s ability to designate marine national monuments, and give OCS lease sales authority to the secretary of interior instead of relying solely on the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management’s (BOEM) five-year plan.

Trump Taps AccuWeather CEO To Head NOAA, Breaking With Precedent Of Nominating Scientists

2019-08-28T14:39:32+00:00 October 12, 2017|

Barry Myers, the chief executive of the private weather forecasting company AccuWeather, is President Trump’s pick to run the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The appointment of Myers, a businessman and lawyer, breaks from the recent precedent of scientists leading the agency tasked with a large, complex and technically demanding portfolio.

Trump Administration Denies Endangered Species Protection To Pacific Walruses

2019-08-28T14:46:58+00:00 October 11, 2017|

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has moved to remove Endangered Species Act protections from Pacific Walruses, citing their ability to adapt and persist during changes in their climate and environment. "The Pacific walrus population has persisted through past climate change events however, the ability of the Pacific walrus population to adapt to ...

On Thin Ice

2019-08-28T14:55:20+00:00 October 10, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) (Credit: Kevin J. Neff/U.S. Coast Guard ) What It Was The Senate Arctic Caucus, Senate Oceans Caucus, and Congressional Arctic Working Group, in conjunction with the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (U.S. Helsinki Commission), hosted a briefing, “A New Ocean In The North: Perils And Possibilities.” Why [...]

Science: Predicting The Future, Saving Lives

2019-08-28T16:51:42+00:00 October 2, 2017|

The United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National​ ​Oceanic​ ​and​ ​Atmospheric​ ​Administration (NOAA) and partners, in conjunction with Senators Shelley Moore Capito (WV) and Bill Nelson (FL) hosted a briefing, “How Science Supports Flood Forecasting and Public Safety.”

September’s Congressional Wrap Up

2019-08-28T16:54:26+00:00 October 2, 2017|

One bill in COL’s legislative tracker, Continuing Appropriations Act, 2018 and Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Requirements Act, 2017 (H.R. 601) was signed into law this month. It includes a continuing resolution to fund the federal government below Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 levels (there was a 0.7 percent across-the-board cut) through December 8, extends the National Flood Insurance Program through the same date, and provides $15.25 billion in emergency disaster relief funds. The Make America Secure and Prosperous Appropriations Act, 2018 (H.R. 3354), which consists of all FY 2018 House appropriations bills, passed out of the House this month by a vote of 211-198.

Debate Continues Over Magnuson-Stevens Act Reauthorization

2019-08-28T17:01:06+00:00 October 2, 2017|

The House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power and Oceans held a hearing to address four federal fisheries management bills. Two would reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA; PL 109-479) – the Strengthening Fishing Communities and Increasing Flexibility in Fisheries Management Act (H.R. 200) and the Strengthening Fishing Communities through Improving Science, Increasing Flexibility, and Modernizing Fisheries Management Act (a discussion draft that has not been introduced).

A #2 For NOAA?

2019-08-28T17:02:32+00:00 October 2, 2017|

The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee held a hearing to consider four presidential nominees subject to Senate confirmation, including Rear Admiral Timothy Gallaudet (Ret.) to be deputy administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Suddenly, Trump Wants To Spend Millions Of Dollars On STEM In Public Schools

2019-08-28T17:19:12+00:00 September 27, 2017|

During the 2016 presidential campaign, it was Hillary Clinton who talked about spending federal money to provide more STEM education — especially computer science classes for all students. Donald Trump wasn’t much interested then — and his proposed fiscal 2018 budget didn’t spread much love in that direction either. It zeroed out one of the Education Department’s main programs that could be used for such a purpose, and it eliminated funding for NASA’s education office (which, among other things, oversees efforts to support women and underrepresented minorities in STEM fields).

Fishing For Change

2019-08-28T17:28:47+00:00 September 18, 2017|

The Senate Science, Commerce, and Transportation Subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries, and Coast Guard held a third hearing on the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act reauthorization on Tuesday titled “Reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act: Oversight of Fisheries Management Successes and Challenges.”

Omnibus Spending Bill Passes House

2019-08-28T17:30:00+00:00 September 18, 2017|

The House voted to pass H.R. 3354, the Make America Secure and Prosperous Appropriations Act, 2018 along a largely party line vote (211-198). Congress has until December 8 to pass bills funding federal agencies for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 (thanks to a three-month continuing resolution approved two weeks ago) or the government shuts down. The House has now passed all 12 bills in one omnibus package.

Stop Gap Measure Saves The Day: No October Government Shutdown, Disaster Relief Approved

2019-08-28T17:33:20+00:00 September 11, 2017|

To avert a government shutdown at the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 (September 30), the Senate and House both voted to pass a short-term continuing resolution (CR), Continuing Appropriations Act, 2018 and Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Requirements Act, 2017 (H.R. 601). Simultaneously, the House began floor debate on an omnibus consisting of eight spending bills, the Make America Secure and Prosperous Appropriations Act, 2018 (H.R. 3354).

EPA Now Requires Political Aide’s Sign-off For Agency Awards, Grant Applications

2019-08-28T17:44:38+00:00 September 5, 2017|

The Environmental Protection Agency has taken the unusual step of putting a political operative in charge of vetting the hundreds of millions of dollars in grants the EPA distributes annually, assigning final funding decisions to a former Trump campaign aide with little environmental policy experience. In this role, John Konkus reviews every award the agency gives out, along with every grant solicitation before it is issued. According to both career and political employees, Konkus has told staff that he is on the lookout for “the double C-word” — climate change — and repeatedly has instructed grant officers to eliminate references to the subject in solicitations.

Federal Court Upholds Seafood Traceability Rule; Targets Fraud

2019-08-28T17:49:41+00:00 September 1, 2017|

Big business, lobbyists say it's too costly to make sure the fish they sell is what the labels say it is. A new federal plan to combat seafood fraud by requiring the fishing industry to trace their catches from boat or farm to the U.S. border has survived a court challenge. The Seafood Traceability Rule surfaced during President Barack Obama’s final days in office and is scheduled to take effect on Jan. 1, 2018. For the first time, it requires seafood importers of species like tuna, grouper, swordfish, red snapper and blue crab to track fish entering the U.S. by species and origin.

Senator Sullivan Presses To Re-approve Law Governing Federal Fisheries

2019-08-28T17:53:15+00:00 August 25, 2017|

Sooner or later, Congress will have to start wading through dozens of fights that go along with re-approving the key law that governs federally managed fisheries. Sen. Dan Sullivan is pushing for sooner, pressing the Commerce Committee to start advancing a revisit of the Magnuson-Stevens Act, historically brushed up in Washington every decade or so, but not since 2007. As part of Sullivan's effort to advance MSA to re-authorization, the Republican senator on Wednesday convened a meeting in Soldotna for a subcommittee that deals with fishery policy to hear testimony from a variety of industry leaders. State and federal government leaders were among the 14 panelists, and so were commercial and sport fish business owners.

US Government Disbands Climate-Science Advisory Committee

2019-08-28T17:55:56+00:00 August 21, 2017|

Panel sought to help businesses and state and local governments prepare for the effects of global warming. President Donald Trump's administration has disbanded a government advisory committee that was intended to help the country prepare for a changing climate. The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration established the committee in 2015 to help businesses and state and local governments make use of the next national climate assessment. The legally mandated report, due in 2018, will lay out the latest climate-change science and describe how global warming is likely to affect the United States, now and in coming decades.

Trump To Reverse Obama-Era Order Aimed At Planning For Climate Change

2019-08-28T17:56:50+00:00 August 21, 2017|

President Trump signed an executive order Tuesday that he said would streamline the approval process for building infrastructure such as roads, bridges and offices by eliminating a planning step related to climate change and flood dangers. Speaking in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, Trump said that the approval process for projects was “badly broken” and that the nation’s infrastructure was a “massive self-inflicted wound on our country.” Trump said that “no longer” would there be “one job-killing delay after another” for new projects. But he did not provide any proposal on how his much-promised infrastructure program would be financed or what it would include.

What DOD’s Reorg Means For Tech And Acquisition

2019-08-28T18:00:27+00:00 August 17, 2017|

The Pentagon has released its long-anticipated report detailing plans to restructure the organizations that manage acquisition and technology research for the Department of Defense. The so-called Section 901 report, officially titled "Restructuring the Department of Defense Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Organization and Chief Management Officer Organization," was delivered to Congress on Aug. 1.

Sorry, Charlie: Trump Rejects Bid To List Tuna As Endangered

2019-08-28T18:02:48+00:00 August 15, 2017|

The Trump administration on Tuesday chose not to list the Pacific bluefin tuna as an endangered species, rejecting a petition by the largest global conservation group that the U.S. is a member of, with France, South Korea, Australia, and several other countries. The Commerce Department's National Marine Fisheries Service announced the decision after a 12-month review of the request that started under the Obama administration.

White House Reviewing New Report That Finds Strong Link Between Climate Change, Human Activity

2019-08-29T08:40:21+00:00 August 14, 2017|

A climate report based on work conducted by scientists in 13 federal agencies is under active review at the White House, and its conclusions about the far-reaching damage already occurring from global warming are at odds with the Trump administration’s views. The report, known as the Climate Science Special Report, finds it is “extremely likely” that more than half of the rise in temperatures over the past four decades has been caused by human activity — in contrast to Trump Cabinet members’ views that the mag nitude of that contribution is uncertain.

Trio Of Ocean And Great Lakes Bills Passes Senate Committee

2019-08-29T08:43:46+00:00 August 7, 2017|

Making science-based decisions requires data and information. Ocean and coastal policies and management decisions also require current and robust observations and monitoring. All three bipartisan bills will advance monitoring and research of the ocean, Great Lakes, and fisheries through grants, linking programs (ICOOS and FOARAM) and topics (ocean observations with sound and with economy), and by updating important indices.

July’s Congressional Wrap Up

2019-08-29T08:47:43+00:00 August 7, 2017|

Nothing in COL’s legislative tracker was signed into law this month, but several items did pass out of committee, the House, or the Senate. Notably, the Save Our Seas Act of 2017 (S.756) passed the Senate with unanimous consent last week. The legislation (and its counterpart in the House (H.R. 2748)) reauthorizes and amends the Marine Debris Act (P.L. 109-332) “to promote international action to reduce marine debris.”

At Drought Hearing, Senators Worry National Weather Service Funding Will Dry Up

2019-08-29T08:50:17+00:00 August 7, 2017|

Dry weather continues to be problematic for Western states, and climate change predictions indicate droughts will only worsen. The president’s budget request for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 proposes funding cuts to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) by 16 percent – and the proposed four percent decrease to the agency’s National Weather Service would challenge the program. The National Weather Service plays a crucial role in understanding drought patterns, preparing communities for limited water availability, and helping scientists understand the changing climate. Stakeholders say forecasting research and technology innovations are key to future preparedness.

Load More Posts