What Sparked The Cambrian Explosion?

2016-02-18T15:19:22+00:00 February 18, 2016|
Modern stromatolites in Hamelin Pool Marine Nature Reserve, Western Australia. (Credit: Paul Harrison/ Wikimedia Commons)

(Click to enlarge) Modern stromatolites in Hamelin Pool Marine Nature Reserve, Western Australia. (Credit: Paul Harrison/ Wikimedia Commons)

A series of dark, craggy pinnacles rises 80 meters above the grassy plains of Namibia.

(From Scientific American/ Douglas Fox) — The peaks call to mind something ancient — the burial mounds of past civilizations or the tips of vast pyramids buried by the ages.

The stone formations are indeed monuments of a faded empire, but not from anything hewn by human hands. They are pinnacle reefs, built by cyanobacteria on the shallow sea floor 543 million years ago, during a time known as the Ediacaran period. The ancient world occupied by these reefs was truly alien. The oceans held so little oxygen that modern fish would quickly founder and die there. A gooey mat of microbes covered the sea floor at the time, and on that blanket lived a variety of enigmatic animals whose bodies resembled thin, quilted pillows. Most were stationary, but a few meandered blindly over the slime, grazing on the microbes. Animal life at this point was simple, and there were no predators. But an evolutionary storm would soon upend this quiet world.

Within several million years, this simple ecosystem would disappear, and give way to a world ruled by highly mobile animals that sported modern anatomical features. The Cambrian explosion, as it is called, produced arthropods with legs and compound eyes, worms with feathery gills and swift predators that could crush prey in tooth-rimmed jaws. Biologists have argued for decades over what ignited this evolutionary burst. Some think that a steep rise in oxygen sparked the change, whereas others say that it sprang from the development of some key evolutionary innovation, such as vision. The precise cause has remained elusive, in part because so little is known about the physical and chemical environment at that time.

Read the full article here: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-sparked-the-cambrian-explosion1/