Raising Seafood

2018-02-05T14:22:19+00:00 February 5, 2018|

(Credit: South Dakota State University) What It Was The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee held a hearing titled, “Growing The Future: Opportunities To Support Domestic Seafood Through Aquaculture.” Why It Matters Seafood is a valuable staple for many Americans, and advances in research have made it possible to produce fish and [...]

How Blockchain Is Strengthening Tuna Traceability To Combat Illegal Fishing

2018-01-26T13:07:31+00:00 January 26, 2018|

(Credit: Mern/ AP) In a significant development for global fisheries, blockchain technology is now being used to improve tuna traceability to help stop illegal and unsustainable fishing practices in the Pacific Islands tuna industry. (From International Business Times/ By Candice Visser and Quentin Hanich) -- The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in Australia, Fiji [...]

Vaccines Not Protecting Farmed Fish From Disease

2018-01-25T11:09:13+00:00 January 25, 2018|

(Credit: Wikimedia/ Alessandro Duci) The vaccines used by commercial fish farmers are not protecting fish from disease, according to a new study. (From Science Daily) -- The study was compiled by researchers at the University of Waterloo, the Pontifical Catholic University of Valparaiso and Chile's University of Valparaiso. It showed vaccinated fish tend [...]

How A Tiny Portion Of The World’s Oceans Could Help Meet Global Seafood Demand

2017-09-08T10:25:54+00:00 September 8, 2017|

Aquaculture will have to be the primary source of our seafood now and into the future. Seafood is an essential staple in the diets of people around the world. Global consumption of fish and shellfish has more than doubled over the last 50 years, and is expected to keep rising with global population growth. Many people assume that most seafood is something that we catch in the wild with lines, trawls and traps. In fact, aquaculture (aquatic farming) accounts for just over half of all the seafood consumed worldwide.

Federal Court Upholds Seafood Traceability Rule; Targets Fraud

2017-09-01T09:40:29+00:00 September 1, 2017|

Big business, lobbyists say it's too costly to make sure the fish they sell is what the labels say it is. A new federal plan to combat seafood fraud by requiring the fishing industry to trace their catches from boat or farm to the U.S. border has survived a court challenge. The Seafood Traceability Rule surfaced during President Barack Obama’s final days in office and is scheduled to take effect on Jan. 1, 2018. For the first time, it requires seafood importers of species like tuna, grouper, swordfish, red snapper and blue crab to track fish entering the U.S. by species and origin.

Sorry, Charlie: Trump Rejects Bid To List Tuna As Endangered

2017-08-15T09:42:01+00:00 August 15, 2017|

The Trump administration on Tuesday chose not to list the Pacific bluefin tuna as an endangered species, rejecting a petition by the largest global conservation group that the U.S. is a member of, with France, South Korea, Australia, and several other countries. The Commerce Department's National Marine Fisheries Service announced the decision after a 12-month review of the request that started under the Obama administration.

House Fishes For Improvements To Magnuson-Stevens Act

2017-07-24T15:49:00+00:00 July 24, 2017|

Only 31 years ago, fleets from foreign countries could fish as close as 12 nautical miles to the United States shoreline. Fish populations were severely depleted, impacting livelihoods for fishers and threatening biodiversity. As a result, Congress passed the bipartisan Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA). This law extends U.S. jurisdiction to 200 nautical miles, uses science-based management to rebuild stocks and prevent overfishing, and ensures an economically sustainable yield via quotas and annual catch limits. The 1976 law created eight regional fishery management councils and has been updated twice, once in 1996 and again in 2007. Thanks to these efforts, U.S. fish populations are rebuilding, and now, 90 percent of fisheries fall below their annual catch limits. Last week, the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water, Power and Oceans held a hearing to discuss areas for improvement to consider upon reauthorization. Both sides of the aisle praised the successes of the law and conceded need for change but had different ideas for what those alterations might be.

A Blue Revolution

2017-06-19T14:28:53+00:00 June 19, 2017|

Imagine our country being on the verge of a second Industrial Revolution – an economic boom so powerful that it alters the United States economy – and the world’s – forever. This is the picture Dr. Doug McCauley (Assistant Professor, Marine Science Institute, University of California Santa Barbara) painted at the beginning of a congressional briefing, hosted by COMPASS, entitled “Counting on Ocean Benefits: A science briefing on the links between the ocean, our economy, and human well-being.”

Six Years After The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

2016-10-24T15:27:12+00:00 October 24, 2016|

On April 20, 2010, the Gulf of Mexico and the lives and livelihoods of those dependent on it changed after an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig sent oil gushing from the sea floor for 87 days. Efforts are still being made to understand how the 3.1 million barrels of oil and 1.8 million gallons of chemical dispersant (used to break the oil into smaller droplets) have and will affect life in the Gulf of Mexico – both aquatic and human – and the ecosystem itself. At a congressional briefing sponsored by retiring Representative Sam Farr (CA-20), experts came together to discuss the state of understanding of the effects of the spill and direction for the future.

From Bivalves To Blue Crabs: Acidification Brings Challenges To New Marine Life

2018-02-14T14:29:28+00:00 September 26, 2016|

In school, most students learn to measure acidity or pH with a litmus test. Unfortunately, monitoring the acidity of the ocean is not as simple as dunking a small piece of paper in liquid and waiting for the color to change, and the impacts of acidity changes to marine life are more complex than a simple change in color. Atmospheric carbon dioxide is absorbed by the ocean, which makes it difficult for marine calcifiers (a group comprised of many different organisms, such as molluscs, crustaceans, and corals) to make their own shells and skeletons. Ocean acidification doesn’t just harm these creatures. It threatens our nation’s economic stability, from our $7.3 billion seafood industry to our $101.1 billion recreation and tourism sector. But it doesn’t stop there – it also affects our homeland security.

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