Federal Regulations And Rulemaking Process Targeted In Bills Introduced In First Days of 115th Congress

2017-01-09T15:28:43+00:00 January 9, 2017|

It took a matter of hours after the 115th Congress was sworn in on January 3 for bills to be introduced in the House that would significantly impact executive branch regulations and rulemaking. The Midnight Rules Relief Act of 2017 (H.R. 21) and the Regulations From the Executive in Need of Scrutiny (REINS) Act (H.R. 26) both passed the House (along nearly party-line votes) less than 56 hours after the start of the session.

Scientists Ponder The Way Forward Under Incoming Administration

2016-12-23T09:53:28+00:00 December 23, 2016|

The recent U.S. presidential election loomed large last week at the world’s largest annual gathering of Earth and space scientists, the American Geophysical Union’s (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. When Eos asked some of the more than 20,000 scientists at the meeting what they thought the election’s outcome means for the Earth and space sciences, we heard a wide range of responses, from dismissal of the election’s importance to deep concern.

Conferenced American Innovation and Competitiveness Act Lands On The President’s Desk

2016-12-19T16:02:58+00:00 December 19, 2016|

While students around the country were recalling organic chemistry processes and physics formulas during their end-of-semester exams last Friday, Congress was also at work. Following in the Senate’s footsteps, the House passed the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act (S. 3084), a reauthorization of the America Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology Education and Science Act of 2007, or America COMPETES, which was last reauthorized in 2010. The 2016 bill outlines policies for the National Science Foundation (NSF); the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); and other federal science and innovation programs, including science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education programs.

Congress Extends Fiscal Year 2017 Funding Continuing Resolution To April 28

2016-12-12T15:38:27+00:00 December 12, 2016|

With less than an hour to go before the continuing resolution (CR) funding the federal government expired last Friday, Congress passed an extension through April 28th, narrowly averting a government shutdown. Responding to the president-elect’s request for input on Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 appropriations, the stopgap measure pushes appropriations decisions until after President-elect Trump is sworn in.

Groups Urge Trump To Appoint Science Adviser

2016-11-29T16:39:20+00:00 November 29, 2016|

The leaders of 29 science organizations are urging President-elect Donald Trump to meet with them and quickly appoint a science adviser. Signers of the new Trump letter include most major science groups, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science and American Geophysical Union. Appointment of an adviser would help the president-elect analyze effective ways to use science and technology to address national challenges, the leaders said.

Waste Not, Want Not: OMB Memorandum Promotes Efficient Agency Spending

2016-11-28T15:26:46+00:00 November 28, 2016|

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) released a memorandum last week titled “Promoting Efficient Spending to Support Agency Operations.,” The document builds on years-long efforts to save taxpayer dollars by improving agency operations and efficiency. Section Two of the memo focuses on oversight of expenses related to federally-sponsored and-hosted conferences, which “play an important role in the federal government” through improved collaboration and knowledge sharing.

Experts Agree: Tackle Obstructions to Ocean Observing

2016-11-21T15:34:02+00:00 November 21, 2016|

A teacher in Boise checks his weather app and packs an umbrella while a Miami businesswoman decides to work from home because the local news announces her usual route to work is flooded. What do these two have in common? The information they rely on for their daily activities depends on observational data from the ocean. Some ocean observations provide real-time results, but others must be continuously collected for years before significant patterns and changes can be detected and analyzed. Due to the vital importance of observing systems to the benefit of our nation’s economy, national security, and scientific enterprise, the National Academy of Science’s Ocean Studies Board ad hoc observations committee held a two-day workshop to hear expert opinions on ocean observation systems as they draft a report prioritizing imperative ocean variables for climate research.

NSF Meeting Highlights Accomplishments and Progress

2016-11-14T12:24:00+00:00 November 14, 2016|

What do that MRI you had after damaging your knee while running, knowing whether to bring an umbrella to work, and antifreeze in Antarctic fish have in common?MRIs, the Doppler radar, and the identification of “antifreeze” glycoproteins in Antarctic fish were made possible through research funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). In addition to its 66-year history of promoting scientific progress, the NSF funds 24 percent of federally-supported research at colleges and universities across the nation. The 24-member National Science Board (NSB) leads NSF and meets five times per year, most recently on November 8 and 9. NSF Director Dr. France Córdova opened the meeting by touting some of the agency’s monumental successes in 2016, including six NSF-supported scientists winning Nobel Prizes and 213 teachers being awarded the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching.

Resiliency Reaches All Corners Of The Coast Thanks To Sea Grant

2016-09-26T16:54:05+00:00 September 26, 2016|

Students in Alaska take a field trip to a local salmon stream. An artificial reef is built off the coast of Florida. A duck hunter cleans his gear in Wisconsin. A lifeguard in Delaware explains rip currents to a family on their beach vacation. Even though these differing coastal activities take place over the entire continental U.S., they all have the National Sea Grant College Program (Sea Grant), in common. Sea Grant is comprised of a network of 33 programs along the nation’s coasts that support “research, education, outreach, and extension activities that provide communities with the tools to increase their resiliency capacities.” Sea Grant and the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation held a briefing on the necessity of economic resiliency in coastal communities in the U.S. and featured three speakers who attested to the importance of resiliency and of Sea Grant’s support.

Merit Review Report Is Now Available

2016-09-26T14:35:32+00:00 September 26, 2016|

“Merit review is the lifeblood of NSF. It is how we identify the best science to fund. It is the core of promoting the progress of science and the reason taxpayers give the NSF and the research community so much independence,” said John Anderson, Chair of the National Science Board’s Committee on Audit and Oversight.

National Science Board Touts Merits of Merit Review And Looks To The Future

2016-08-15T12:33:48+00:00 August 15, 2016|

A former patent clerk named Albert Einstein sketched notes on the theory of relativity in 1905. More than a century later, the long-standing theory was validated when the Laser Interferometer Gravitation-Wave Observatory detected gravitational waves originating from the collision of two black holes. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), which makes possible scientific discovery from space observations to human genetics to volcanic influence on sea level.

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