Member Highlight: More Sharks Ditching Annual Migration As Ocean Warms

2018-06-18T10:21:19+00:00 June 18, 2018|

Blacktip sharks usually travel in the tens of thousands from North Carolina to Florida. But thanks to climate change, more are staying put. (From National Geographic / By Eric Niiler ) -- The annual migration of blacktip sharks from southern Florida to North Carolina has begun—and researchers who track this amazing ritual say there are seeing only about one-third the usual [...]

Member Highlight: Alien Waters: Neighboring Seas Are Flowing into a Warming Arctic Ocean

2018-05-14T14:17:29+00:00 May 14, 2018|

(Credit: Pablo Clemente-Colon / National Ice Center) Above Scandinavia, on the Atlantic side of the Arctic Ocean, mackerel, cod, and other fish native to the European coast are migrating through increasingly ice-free waters, heading deeper into the Arctic Basin toward Siberia. . (From Yale Environment 360/ By Cheryl Katz) -- Thousands of miles to the west, [...]

Sea Butterflies Repair Shell Damage From Ocean Acidification

2018-01-31T15:26:52+00:00 January 30, 2018|

(Credit: British Antarctic Survey) A new study of tiny marine snails called sea butterflies shows the great lengths these animals go to repair damage caused by ocean acidification. The paper, led by researchers at British Antarctic Survey, is published this month in the journal Nature Communications. (From Phys.org) --The ocean absorbs around one [...]

2017 Was The Hottest Year Yet In The World’s Ocean

2018-01-29T17:19:52+00:00 January 29, 2018|

(Credit: Mario Tama, Getty) Oceans aren't likely to cool any time soon, a new study finds. In fact, 2017 was the warmest year on record in the ocean, according to researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences. (From National Geographic/ By Sarah Gibbens) -- Their findings indicate a "long-term warming trend driven by human [...]

Member Highlight: New Study: Industry Conservation Ethic Proves Critical To Gulf Of Maine Lobster Fishery

2018-01-29T13:07:28+00:00 January 26, 2018|

(Credit: Gulf of Maine Research Institute) A new study, led by scientists at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute and colleagues at the University of Maine and NOAA, demonstrates how conservation practices championed by Maine lobstermen help make the lobster fishery resilient to climate change. (From Phys.org) -- For generations, lobstermen in Maine [...]

New Eocene Fossil Data Suggest Climate Models May Underestimate Future Polar Warming

2018-01-24T10:05:33+00:00 January 24, 2018|

(Credit: Laura Cotton) A new international analysis of marine fossils shows that warming of the polar oceans during the Eocene, a greenhouse period that provides a glimpse of Earth's potential future climate, was greater than previously thought. (From Science Daily) -- By studying the chemical composition of fossilized foraminifera, tiny single-celled animals that [...]

Member Highlight: New Study Identifies Thermometer For Global Ocean

2018-01-08T15:47:05+00:00 January 5, 2018|

(Credit: Jay Johnson/ IDDO) There's a new way to measure the average temperature of the ocean thanks to researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. In an article published in the Jan. 4, 2018, issue of the journal Nature, geoscientist Jeff Severinghaus and colleagues at Scripps Oceanography [...]

The Caribbean Is Stressed Out

2018-01-03T17:50:22+00:00 January 3, 2018|

(Credit: Karen Koltes) Forty percent of the world's 7.6 billion people live in coastal cities and towns. A team including Smithsonian marine biologists just released 25 years of data about the health of Caribbean coasts from the Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity Program (CARICOMP).  (From Science Daily) -- The study provides new insights into [...]

Antarctic Glacier’s Rough Belly Exposed

2017-11-28T16:54:45+00:00 November 28, 2017|

The melting Antarctic ice stream that is currently adding most to sea-level rise may be more resilient to change than previously recognized. New radar images reveal the mighty Pine Island Glacier (PIG) to be sitting on a rugged rock bed populated by big hills, tall cliffs and deep scour marks.

Surfing for Science: Ocean Enthusiasts Could Help Gauge Coastal Warming

2017-11-22T09:08:21+00:00 November 22, 2017|

Researchers want to enlist surfers, scuba divers and anglers to monitor hard-to-reach areas vulnerable to climate change. Satellites are good at measuring temperatures over vast stretches of ocean, but less accurate at monitoring a particularly important type of marine environment—coastlines. Now help could come from an unlikely source: a water sports “navy” of surfers, anglers, scuba divers and others. A U.K.-led team of researchers has proposed this alliance to help gather coastal climate data in a recent paper in Frontiers in Marine Science.

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