June’s Congressional Wrap Up

2018-07-16T17:03:56+00:00 July 16, 2018|

From: Ocean News Weekly/ By: Ocean Leadership Staff  What Passed Many appropriations bills moved last month, including the Senate’s Commerce-Justice-Science bill, which was approved by both the committee and subcommittee. So far, the full appropriations committees have approved all 12 bills in the Senate and 10 in the House. A minibus that includes the [...]

Scientists Pinpoint How Ocean Acidification Weakens Coral Skeletons

2018-02-01T15:05:53+00:00 February 1, 2018|

(Credit: Hannah Barkley, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) The rising acidity of the oceans threatens coral reefs by making it harder for corals to build their skeletons. A new study identifies the details of how ocean acidification affects coral skeletons, allowing scientists to predict more precisely where corals will be more vulnerable. (From [...]

Sea Butterflies Repair Shell Damage From Ocean Acidification

2018-01-31T15:26:52+00:00 January 30, 2018|

(Credit: British Antarctic Survey) A new study of tiny marine snails called sea butterflies shows the great lengths these animals go to repair damage caused by ocean acidification. The paper, led by researchers at British Antarctic Survey, is published this month in the journal Nature Communications. (From Phys.org) --The ocean absorbs around one [...]

Melting Ice Could Mess Up Deep-Sea Chemistry

2017-12-04T17:37:38+00:00 November 30, 2017|

Melting glaciers might be making ocean water more acidic, an unexpected finding that's given scientists new cause for concern. A new study published yesterday in the journal Nature Climate Change suggests surprising ways that climate change is drastically altering the water chemistry in deep seas—a process that may happen faster than researchers anticipated.

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef Receives Fertility Treatment

2017-11-27T14:10:15+00:00 November 27, 2017|

Australian scientists are optimistic that a fertility treatment for coral could help regenerate the Great Barrier Reef. The 2,300 kilometer long coral reef -- a UNESCO World Heritage Site -- has been extensively damaged by a process known as coral bleaching in which warm water stresses the organism and causes it to die.

Member Highlight: Chukchi Mooring Returns A Year Of pH Data

2017-11-06T15:52:06+00:00 November 6, 2017|

(Click to enlarge). The Chukchi Ecosystem Observatory is maintained by a multi-institutional, multi-investigator partnership that includes the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Alaska Ocean Observing System, the North Pacific Research Board, Olgoonik-Fairweather, Université Laval, and the University of Washington. On a recent research mission, University of Alaska Fairbanks scientists brought home the first [...]

What Scientists Are Learning About The Impact Of An Acidifying Ocean

2017-10-03T16:43:44+00:00 October 3, 2017|

The effects of ocean acidification on marine life have only become widely recognized in the past decade. Now researchers are rapidly expanding the scope of investigations into what falling pH means for ocean ecosystems. The ocean is becoming increasingly acidic as climate change accelerates and scientists are ramping up investigations into the impact on marine life and ecosystems. In just a few years, the young field of ocean acidification research has expanded rapidly – progressing from short-term experiments on single species to complex, long-term studies that encompass interactions across interdependent species.

Key To Speeding Up Carbon Sequestration Discovered

2017-07-20T10:56:03+00:00 July 20, 2017|

Scientists at Caltech and USC have discovered a way to speed up the slow part of the chemical reaction that ultimately helps Earth to safely lock away, or sequester, carbon dioxide into the ocean. Simply adding a common enzyme to the mix, the researchers have found, can make that rate-limiting part of the process go 500 times faster. A paper about the work appears online the week of July 17 ahead of publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

‘Weedy’ Fish Species To Take Over Our Future Oceans

2017-07-07T10:40:11+00:00 July 7, 2017|

University of Adelaide researchers have for the first time demonstrated that the ocean acidification expected in the future will reduce fish diversity significantly, with small 'weedy' species dominating marine environments. Published today in Current Biology, the researchers studied species interactions in natural marine environments at underwater volcanic vents, where concentrations of CO2 match those predicted for oceans at the end of the century. They were compared with adjacent marine environments with current CO2 levels.

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