Surfing for Science: Ocean Enthusiasts Could Help Gauge Coastal Warming

2017-11-22T09:08:21+00:00 November 22, 2017|

Researchers want to enlist surfers, scuba divers and anglers to monitor hard-to-reach areas vulnerable to climate change. Satellites are good at measuring temperatures over vast stretches of ocean, but less accurate at monitoring a particularly important type of marine environment—coastlines. Now help could come from an unlikely source: a water sports “navy” of surfers, anglers, scuba divers and others. A U.K.-led team of researchers has proposed this alliance to help gather coastal climate data in a recent paper in Frontiers in Marine Science.

Deeply Talks: Why Plastic Straws Are Key to Fighting Ocean Pollution

2017-11-21T16:08:16+00:00 November 21, 2017|

The world uses 1 billion unrecyclable plastic straws a day – 500 million in the United States – an untold number of which end up in the ocean, polluting the water and coastlines and posing a deadly threat to sea turtles and other marine animals. The Lonely Whale Foundation’s “Strawless in Seattle” campaign resulted in the elimination of 2.3 million disposable plastic straws in the month of September in that city.

Fueling The Future

2017-10-12T18:01:48+00:00 October 10, 2017|

A group of Jackson School scientists and students embark on a high-stakes research mission. Standing on the helideck of the Helix Q4000 with nothing but waves in sight, Peter Flemings is bleary eyed and exhausted. But, for this moment at least, the Jackson School of Geosciences professor and chief scientist of the coring mission is relieved and something akin to happy. The scene marks a seminal moment in a ground-breaking project, an $80-million, multi-year national effort that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) picked the Jackson School to lead. Flemings and his team have finally hit pay dirt, pulling a core of frozen methane hydrate from about 1,300 feet under the Gulf floor, through a mile of water, and to the deck of the deep-water coring vessel, while still keeping the methane hydrate under pressure.

Member Highlight: Fueling The Future

2017-10-10T12:59:21+00:00 October 10, 2017|

A group of Jackson School scientists and students embark on a high-stakes research mission. Standing on the helideck of the Helix Q4000 with nothing but waves in sight, Peter Flemings is bleary eyed and exhausted. But, for this moment at least, the Jackson School of Geosciences professor and chief scientist of the coring mission is relieved and something akin to happy. The scene marks a seminal moment in a ground-breaking project, an $80-million, multi-year national effort that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) picked the Jackson School to lead. Flemings and his team have finally hit pay dirt, pulling a core of frozen methane hydrate from about 1,300 feet under the Gulf floor, through a mile of water, and to the deck of the deep-water coring vessel, while still keeping the methane hydrate under pressure.

Oyster Shells Inspire New Method To Make Superstrong, Flexible Polymers

2017-06-15T16:36:30+00:00 June 15, 2017|

Researchers at Columbia Engineering have demonstrated for the first time a new technique that takes its inspiration from the nacre of oyster shells, a composite material that has extraordinary mechanical properties, including great strength and resilience. By changing the crystallization speed of a polymer initially well mixed with nanoparticles, the team was able to control how the nanoparticles self-assemble into structures at three very different length scale regimes. This multiscale ordering can make the base material almost an order of magnitude stiffer while still retaining the desired deformability and lightweight behavior of the polymeric materials. The study, led by Sanat Kumar, Bykhovsky Professor of Chemical Engineering, is published June 7 online in ACS Central Science.

Call For Volunteers: Smithsonian National Museum Of Natural History, Narwhal Exhibit (August)

2017-10-10T13:19:58+00:00 May 5, 2017|

Credit: Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History In August 2017, the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History will be opening a new exhibit, Narwhal: Revealing an Arctic legend, and is currently in the process of recruiting volunteers to interact with visitors in this exhibit and the Sant Ocean hall. All training necessary will be [...]

New Species Of Fossil Dolphin Found

2016-08-22T15:26:08+00:00 August 23, 2016|

Scientists have identified a new species of dolphin that lived 25 million years ago. The extinct animal has been described through re-examination of a specimen that's been in a museum collection since 1951.

Female Scientists To Sample Plastics In All Five Great Lakes

2016-08-17T13:09:51+00:00 August 19, 2016|

Female scientists from the U.S. and Canada will set sail Aug. 20 on all five Great Lakes and connecting waterways to sample plastic debris pollution and to raise public awareness about the issue. Event organizers say eXXpedition Great Lakes 2016 will include the largest number of simultaneous samplings for aquatic plastic debris in history. The all-female crew members on the seven lead research vessels also aim to inspire young women to pursue careers in science and engineering.

“Ghost Fish” Seen Alive For The First Time

2016-08-01T09:36:05+00:00 August 1, 2016|

A living, swimming "ghost fish" has been seen for the first time ever. The fish, part of the family Aphyonidae, was caught on camera during an ongoing National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) exploration by the ship Okeanos Explorer.

2016 NOSB Video Contest Winners

2016-07-22T13:33:09+00:00 June 24, 2016|

The National Ocean Sciences Bowl and the National Marine Educators Association are pleased to announce the final winners of the 2016 “Living on the Ocean Planet” Video Contest.

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