Port Infrastructure In Need Of Updates

2018-01-16T15:35:04+00:00 January 16, 2018|

What It Was The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee held a hearing: “America’s water infrastructure needs and challenges,” which focused on improvements for ports through the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA).  Why It Matters Around 90 percent of the food, technology, and clothing we use daily is transported through ports. Whether inland or [...]

Low Ocean Oxygen Levels Causing Large-Scale Death Of Marine Life

2018-01-05T17:25:27+00:00 January 5, 2018|

(Credit: Arcadio Castillo/ Smithsonian) New research has found that in the past 50 years, the amount of ocean areas with zero oxygen has gone up more than fourfold. Low-oxygen sites, as they are called, are regions where water has lost its usual oxygen levels. In coastal water bodies, low-oxygen sites have increased 10-fold [...]

Fisheries Bills Swim Towards House Floor

2018-01-09T17:19:29+00:00 December 18, 2017|

(Credit: NOAA) What It Was The House Natural Resources Committee held a markup of 15 bills including two on fisheries— Strengthening Fishing Communities and Increasing Flexibility in Fisheries Management Act (H.R. 200) and RED SNAPPER Act (H.R. 3588). Both pieces of legislations passed by votes of 23-17 and 22-16, respectively. Why It [...]

Surfing for Science: Ocean Enthusiasts Could Help Gauge Coastal Warming

2017-11-22T09:08:21+00:00 November 22, 2017|

Researchers want to enlist surfers, scuba divers and anglers to monitor hard-to-reach areas vulnerable to climate change. Satellites are good at measuring temperatures over vast stretches of ocean, but less accurate at monitoring a particularly important type of marine environment—coastlines. Now help could come from an unlikely source: a water sports “navy” of surfers, anglers, scuba divers and others. A U.K.-led team of researchers has proposed this alliance to help gather coastal climate data in a recent paper in Frontiers in Marine Science.

Scientists Develop Tool Which Can Predict Coastal Erosion And Recovery In Extreme Storms

2017-10-17T15:12:49+00:00 October 17, 2017|

The damage caused to beaches by extreme storms on exposed energetic coastlines and the rate at which they recover can now be accurately predicted thanks to new research led by the University of Plymouth. Working with the University of New South Wales, scientists have developed a computer model which uses past wave observations and beach assessments to forecast the erosion and/or accretion of beach sediments over the coming year.

The High Cost Sand Mining Extracts From Coastal Ecosystems

2017-09-21T10:21:21+00:00 September 21, 2017|

Researchers say the world faces a sand crisis as skyrocketing demand for the building material leads to the destruction of coastal environments and marine life. When people picture sand spread across idyllic beaches and endless deserts, they understandably think of it as an infinite resource. But as we discuss in a just-published perspective in the journal Science, overexploitation of global supplies of sand is damaging the environment, endangering communities, causing shortages and promoting violent conflict.

Breakthrough Could Help Predict A Catastrophic Loss Of Ocean Oxygen

2017-08-22T12:38:02+00:00 August 22, 2017|

IF THE CURRENT deoxygenation of the ocean mirrors past events, the area of oxygen-deprived waters might double over the next 100 to 350 years, according to a new study. But it could also happen much faster than that, the researchers say. The ocean is losing oxygen due to nutrient pollution and the climate change effects of rising water temperatures and decreased mixing of marine layers.

Sea Level Rise Is Speeding Up In Parts Of The Southeastern U.s.

2017-08-15T09:31:13+00:00 August 15, 2017|

Sea-level rise isn’t just happening; it’s accelerating. And some areas of the United States—like Florida—are seeing “hot spots” where the ocean can creep up six times faster than average. Those are the findings of two new studies published yesterday, which have potentially troubling implications for urban planners trying to address sea-level rise. They also help explain why residents of Florida and North Carolina have seen sharp increases in coastal flooding in recent years.

Will The Great American Eclipse Make Animals Act Strangely? Science Says Yes

2017-08-11T10:13:25+00:00 August 11, 2017|

It’s not just humans who will be affected by the Great American Eclipse coming on Aug. 21 — expect animals to act strangely too. Anecdotal evidence and a few scientific studies suggest that as the moon moves briefly between the sun and the Earth, causing a deep twilight to fall across the land, large swaths of the animal kingdom will alter their behavior.

Marine Reserves A Solution To Bycatch Problem In Oceans

2017-08-08T16:46:55+00:00 August 8, 2017|

Commercial fishermen may be able to catch more of the profitable fish they want with marine reserves than without them, according to a study in the journal PNAS led by the University of California, Davis. Using marine reserves as a management tool could also help the recently rebounded West Coast groundfish fishery sustain itself, the study notes. Marine reserves are a subset of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Some MPAs allow fishing, but marine reserves are areas of the ocean closed to fishing and other extractive activities.

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