Researchers Revolutionize Vital Conservation Tool With Use Of Gold Nanotechnology And Lasers

2017-07-17T17:26:42+00:00 July 17, 2017|

For more than 60 years, researchers have tried to successfully cryopreserve (or freeze) the embryo of zebrafish, a species that is an important medical model for human health. In a new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) provide the first-ever reproducible evidence for the successful cryopreservation of zebrafish embryos.

Climate Change Will Increase Terrorism, Refugee Crises, Resource Scarcity, Experts Say

2017-07-17T16:09:08+00:00 July 17, 2017|

The phrase “climate change” typically conjures up images of drowning polar bears, melting icebergs, and eroding beaches. But did you know climate change may have been instrumental in the political instability that lead to the rise of terrorist groups like ISIS and Boko Haram? At a roundtable discussion presented by House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology Ranking Member Eddie Bernice Johnson (TX-30) and Vice Ranking Member Don Beyer (VA-8), scientists, military experts, and international specialists described the ever-growing threat of climate change to national security. Committee members were present to voice their strong support for climate science funding and coastal resiliency.

One Of The Biggest Icebergs In Recorded History Just Broke Loose From Antarctica

2017-07-12T13:31:17+00:00 July 12, 2017|

Scientists announced Wednesday that a much anticipated break at the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica has occurred, unleashing a massive iceberg that is more than 2,200 square miles in area and weighs a trillion tons. In other words, the iceberg — among the largest in recorded history to splinter off the Antarctic continent — is close to the size of Delaware and consists of almost four times as much ice as the fast melting ice sheet of Greenland loses in a year. It is expected to be given the name “A68” soon, scientists said.

Extreme Coastal Sea Levels More Likely To Occur, New Data, Advanced Modeling Techniques Suggest

2017-07-12T10:49:18+00:00 July 12, 2017|

Improving projections for how much ocean levels may change in the future and what that means for coastal communities has vexed researchers studying sea level rise for years, but a new international study that incorporates extreme events may have just given researchers and coastal planners what they need. The study, published in Nature Communications uses newly available data and advanced models to improve global predictions when it comes to extreme sea levels. The results suggest that extreme sea levels will likely occur more frequently than previously predicted, particularly in the west coast regions of the U.S. and in large parts of Europe and Australia.

As The Arctic Gets Warmer, Our Winters Get Colder

2017-07-11T14:16:15+00:00 July 11, 2017|

In the winter of 2015, New York City’s Hudson River froze—a rare occurrence. Prior to the 2000s, the record shows that the Hudson froze in 1720, 1780, and 1821—a period that overlaps with the so-called Little Ice Age, when the Northern Hemisphere was cooler overall. But since the turn of the century, the lower Hudson has frozen not once, but twice: in 2015 and 2003.

Shells Record West Antarctic Glacier Retreat

2017-07-10T16:10:13+00:00 July 10, 2017|

Scientists are getting a much clearer picture of the retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet over thousands of years, and of the forces driving it. New research indicates that warm waters pulled up from the deep by strong winds sharply undercut glaciers from about 11,000 years ago to 7,500 years ago. This incursion then stopped until it got under way again in the 1940s. The findings are important because they inform our understanding about how the ice may respond in the future.

Extreme Low-Oxygen Eddies In The Atlantic Produce Greenhouse Gases

2017-07-10T11:56:37+00:00 July 10, 2017|

Oxygen in the seawater is not only vital to most marine organisms, its concentrations also affect the chemistry of the ocean and that of the atmosphere above. In oceanic regions with very little oxygen, for example, large amounts of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, also called laughing gas, are produced via biogeochemical processes and can then be released to the atmosphere. Even though a natural moderate oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) exists along some of the eastern boundaries of the Atlantic Ocean, the Atlantic OMZ, unlike the OMZs of the Indian and Pacific oceans, was not considered to be a region of extremely low oxygen concentrations. New findings by an international research team led by the Kiel Excellence Cluster "Future Ocean" and the GEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research Kiel, however, now imply that this picture has to be corrected. This study was published in the Nature Publishing Group journal Scientific Reports.

House Lawmakers Back Amendment Requiring Pentagon Climate Change Report

2017-07-05T12:11:39+00:00 July 5, 2017|

The House Armed Services Committee’s annual defense policy bill will include a provision requiring a Defense Department report on the effects of climate change on military installations. The amendment — brought up by Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) in the readiness portion of Wednesday’s markup — instructs each military service to come up with a list of the top 10 military installations likely to be affected by climate change over the next 20 years. The report would include a list of possible ways to combat such climate change threats as flooding, droughts and increased wildfires.

‘Red Teams’ Gain Prominence To Question Climate Science

2017-06-29T12:05:45+00:00 June 29, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) Global climate change could disrupt the global conveyer belt (Credit: NOAA) Trump administration officials are increasingly floating a new way to raise questions about the scientific findings that humans are driving climate change. It's called red team, blue team. (From Climatewire / by Scott Waldman) -- The concept, which originated in [...]

Member Highlight: The Beach Time Capsule

2017-06-29T09:32:55+00:00 June 29, 2017|

And to think it was all right there in her garage. A load of boxes pulled from biologist Dale Straughan's home yielded a veritable treasure trove for UC Santa Barbara researchers studying the impact of climate change on coastal biodiversity in California.

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