Seagrass On Decline, Jeopardizing Human, Coral Health: Study

2017-02-22T15:56:30+00:00 February 22, 2017|
A new study shows seagrass is an important protector against pollution to humans and coral reefs.  (Credit: Yoruno/Wikimedia Commons)

(Click to enlarge) A new study shows seagrass is an important protector against pollution to humans and coral reefs. (Credit: Yoruno/Wikimedia Commons)

Underwater meadows of seagrass offer important protection against pollution to both humans and coral reefs, but are in jeopardy worldwide due to climate change, sewage and agricultural runoff, researchers said Thursday.

(From Yahoo News / By Jean-Louis Santini)–Places with healthy seagrass — where sponges, clams, small fish and other filter feeders thrive — can reduce bacteria that is harmful to both people and marine life by up to 50 percent, said the study in the journal Science.

Corals located near seagrass meadows showed about half as much disease as those further away from these protective ecosystems, said the findings, presented in Boston at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting.

“The seagrass appear to combat bacteria, and this is the first research to assess whether that coastal ecosystem can alleviate disease associated with marine organisms,” said lead author Joleah Lamb of Cornell University.

The idea for the study began when senior author Drew Harvell, a Cornell professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, was leading an international workshop to examine the health of underwater corals at Spermonde Archipelago in Indonesia.

Within days, the entire research team fell ill with dysentery, and one scientist came down with typhoid.

“I experienced firsthand how threats to both human health and coral health were linked,” Harvell told reporters at the AAAS conference.

“It occurred to me that if we could show that humans as well as corals are at risk from wastewater pollution, and show the role of seagrass ecosystems services in cleanup, it would help create incentives to preserve these valuable ecosystems.”

So researchers returned to test the waters in the same area, a region where freshwater is sparse and solid waste, sewage and wastewater pollution are rampant along the coasts because people do not have septic systems.

Read the full article here: https://www.yahoo.com/news/seagrass-decline-jeopardizing-human-coral-health-study-202708860.html