Scientists Ponder The Way Forward Under Incoming Administration

2017-03-06T10:34:02+00:00 December 20, 2016|
A new X prize offers two $1 million awards for developing better sensors to measure ocean acidification. (Credit: NOAA Environmental Visualization Lab & LiveScience.com)

(Click to enlarge) A new X prize offers two $1 million awards for developing better sensors to measure ocean acidification. (Credit: NOAA Environmental Visualization Lab & LiveScience.com)

The recent U.S. presidential election loomed large last week at the world’s largest annual gathering of Earth and space scientists, the American Geophysical Union’s (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. When Eos asked some of the more than 20,000 scientists at the meeting what they thought the election’s outcome means for the Earth and space sciences, we heard a wide range of responses, from dismissal of the election’s importance to deep concern.

(From EOS, By Randy Showstack) — Nearly all respondents seemed to agree that scientists need to move forward with whatever they were doing before the election with confidence that those scientific endeavors are valued and will continue to be supported by our society.

Find Opportunities Through Sound Science

Change can be difficult, he added, “but people need to get beyond the paranoia about that change and understand what the opportunities are.” Opportunity, White said, involves discovering “How can we do things better given what’s changing.”The election “doesn’t matter because the oceans are nonpartisan,” said Jon White, president and CEO of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership in Washington, D. C. “The way forward is the same way it has been, because we deal with good ocean science. Any policies, any regulations, any decision need to be based on sound science.” Depending on what a new administration does, “there are different opportunities, whether it’s focusing more nationally on homeland security perhaps or things like climate change,” he said.

Read the full article here: https://eos.org/articles/scientists-ponder-the-way-forward-under-incoming-administration