Navy Sees Future Gaps In Subs

2016-07-18T12:44:11+00:00 July 18, 2016|
Crewmembers of the Los Angeles-class submarine USS Annapolis (SSN 760) man the bridge watch after breaking through the ice during Ice Exercise (ICEX 2009) in the Arctic Ocean. (Credit: U.S. Navy, Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tiffini M. Jones)

(Click to enlarge) Crewmembers of the Los Angeles-class submarine USS Annapolis (SSN 760) man the bridge watch after breaking through the ice during Ice Exercise (ICEX 2009) in the Arctic Ocean. (Credit: U.S. Navy, Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tiffini M. Jones)

Like the Coast Guard’s icebreaker shortage, Navy submariners are facing an aging submarine fleet. At a hearing in front of the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection Forces, the discussion centered not only the need to build more submarines but on the technological advances that will be required.

According to Rear Admiral Upper Half Michael E. Jabaley (Program Executive Officer for Submarines, U.S. Navy), this includes moving “beyond a rotating mechanical device to push the ship through the water.” This type of innovation requires a top-notch education to generate superb engineers and scientists. Jabaley also noted that research and technologies are advanced using partnerships with private industry and university researchers. Jabaley and Rear Admiral Upper Half Charles A. Richard (Director, Undersea Warfare Division (N97), U.S. Navy) stressed that more state of the art technologies are needed to maintain American maritime supremacy.