Giant Sea Spiders In Arctic Ocean Puzzle Scientists

2016-01-04T15:26:15+00:00 January 4, 2016|
Sea spiders have long legs and a very small body. The number of walking legs is usually eight (four pairs), but species with five and six pairs have been seen. A proboscis allows them to suck nutrients from soft-bodied invertebrates. Their digestive tract has diverticula extending into the legs. (Credit Wikimedia Commons)

(Click to enlarge) Sea spiders have long legs and a very small body. The number of walking legs is usually eight (four pairs), but species with five and six pairs have been seen. A proboscis allows them to suck nutrients from soft-bodied invertebrates. Their digestive tract has diverticula extending into the legs. (Credit Wikimedia Commons)

Giant sea spiders, as well some other oversized creatures found in the seas around the North and South poles have long puzzled scientists, who have been unable explain why there are so many examples of Polar gigantism.

(From Market Business News) — In a recent study, a team of researchers suggested it may have something to do with the oxygen levels in very cold water.

Sea spiders, also known as Pantopoda or pycnogonids, are sea-dwelling arthropods known to exist in the Arctic and Antarctic Oceans, as well as the Caribbean and Mediterranean seas. There are more than 1,300 known species of them, and they range in size from 0.039 of an inch (1 millimetre) to more than 90 cm (35 inches).

Most sea spiders found in the Arctic and Southern Oceans are very small. However, scientists from the University of Montana, the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and the US Antarctic Program have found some super-big ones, measuring well over 25 cm (9.8 inches).

Read the full article here: http://marketbusinessnews.com/giant-sea-spiders-in-arctic-ocean-puzzle-scientists/118226.