Extra Iron Doesn’t Fertilize The Ancient Pacific Ocean

2016-02-02T17:25:08+00:00 February 2, 2016|
Thousands of years ago, the Earth was going through an ice age and conditions were harsh: it was much colder and windier compared to today, and large amounts of dust were being scattered in the air and much of it contained iron. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

(Click to enlarge) Thousands of years ago, the Earth was going through an ice age and conditions were harsh: it was much colder and windier compared to today, and large amounts of dust were being scattered in the air and much of it contained iron. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Thousands of years ago, the Earth was going through an ice age and conditions were harsh: it was much colder and windier compared to today, and large amounts of dust were being scattered in the air and much of it contained iron.

(From Texas A&M University) — The iron eventually found its way into the oceans and many scientists believe that the extra iron increased the growth of tiny forms of marine life. One part of the puzzle of iron fertilization of the oceans has been evaluated by an international team of researchers that includes a Texas A&M University scientist.

Franco Marcantonio, a professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at Texas A&M, and colleagues from Columbia University, Princeton, the University of California-Santa Cruz and the National Taiwan University have the results of their work published in the current issue of Nature magazine.

Read the full article here: http://today.tamu.edu/2016/01/27/ancient-iron-deposits-found-in-pacific-ocean/