An App And Volunteer Army Are Improving Local Tidal Flood Forecasts

2017-12-08T09:04:41+00:00 December 8, 2017|

(Credit: Virginia Institute of Marine Science) Hundreds of people came out to map the king tides in coastal Virginia in November. Virginia Institute of Marine Science researcher Derek Loftis explains how that is helping the region better prepare as flooding worsens. (From Oceans Deeply/ by Jessica Leber) -- The king tide floods came on a [...]

Satellite Tracking Provides Clues About South Atlantic Sea Turtles’ ‘Lost Years’

2017-12-07T16:50:08+00:00 December 7, 2017|

(Credit: Projeto TAMAR) A University of Central Florida biologist whose groundbreaking work tracking the movements of sea turtle yearlings in the North Atlantic Ocean attracted international attention has completed a similar study in the South Atlantic with surprising results. (From Phys.org) -- South Atlantic sea turtles do not passively ride prevailing currents as historically assumed, [...]

Future Arctic Sea Ice Loss Could Dry Out California

2017-12-07T12:24:48+00:00 December 7, 2017|

(Credit: Graphic by Kathy Seibert/LLNL) Arctic sea ice loss of the magnitude expected in the next few decades could impact California's rainfall and exacerbate future droughts, according to new research led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists. (From Science Daily)-- The dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice cover observed over the satellite [...]

International Whale Shark Research Program Uses NASA Algorithm To Identify, Track Animals

2017-12-06T15:17:13+00:00 December 6, 2017|

Whale shark gliding off Sail Rock in the Gulf of Thailand. (Credit: iStockphoto/Dirk-Jan Mattaar) An international research project tracking whale sharks is being praised as a unique collaboration using 'citizen science' and NASA technology. (From ABC News Australia/By David Weber) -- The project relied on people sending in photos, taken over many years [...]

The Scallop Sees With Space-Age Eyes — Hundreds Of Them

2017-12-06T15:09:24+00:00 December 6, 2017|

Scallop (Credit: Ceri Jones/Haven Diving Services) It’s hard to see what’s so special about a scallop. It looks a lot like a clam, mussel or any other bivalve. Inside its hinged shell lurks a musclebound creature that’s best enjoyed seared in butter. (From New York Times/ By Carl Zimmer) -- But there’s something [...]

New Fish Species Lives 5 Miles Underwater—A Record

2017-12-04T15:47:36+00:00 December 4, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) (Credit: Adam Summers, Friday Harbor Lab, University Of Washington) Scientists have formally identified a new species of snailfish, the deepest ever caught in the Mariana Trench. A related species has been filmed but never collected. (From National Geographic/ By Craig Welch) — It’s cute, almost pink, and about [...]

Jellyfish On The Menu

2017-12-04T16:59:17+00:00 December 4, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) (Credit: University of East Anglia) Squid, sole, dogfish, herring and cod all feed on baby jellyfish – according to new research from the University of East Anglia and the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas). The moon jellyfish is commonly found around the coastlines of Britain. They’re [...]

Why Are There No Sea Snakes In The Atlantic?

2017-12-04T16:58:35+00:00 November 30, 2017|

Sea snakes are an evolutionary success story. With about 70 species, they're the most diverse reptile group in the ocean, outnumbering sea turtle species 10-to-1. They sport a range of physical adaptations for life at sea, including a flattened oar-like tail for paddling and the abilities to smell underwater, hold their breath for hours and go for months without a drink. And although they're not powerful swimmers, they have spread throughout the Pacific and Indian Oceans, ranging from Japan to New Zealand and from South Africa to Central America.

A Model Explains Effects Like The Formation Of Clouds From The Sea

2017-12-04T17:37:40+00:00 November 30, 2017|

All liquids always contain gases in a greater or lesser concentration depending on the pressure and temperature to which it is subjected. These gases almost always end up as more or less small bubbles on the surface of the liquid. When these bubbles explode, especially if they are microscopic, minuscule drops are expelled at great velocity, and the drops almost instantly travel notable distances from the surface of the liquid that they came from.

Melting Ice Could Mess Up Deep-Sea Chemistry

2017-12-04T17:37:38+00:00 November 30, 2017|

Melting glaciers might be making ocean water more acidic, an unexpected finding that's given scientists new cause for concern. A new study published yesterday in the journal Nature Climate Change suggests surprising ways that climate change is drastically altering the water chemistry in deep seas—a process that may happen faster than researchers anticipated.

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