Deeply Talks: Why Plastic Straws Are Key to Fighting Ocean Pollution

2017-11-21T16:08:16+00:00 November 21, 2017|

The world uses 1 billion unrecyclable plastic straws a day – 500 million in the United States – an untold number of which end up in the ocean, polluting the water and coastlines and posing a deadly threat to sea turtles and other marine animals. The Lonely Whale Foundation’s “Strawless in Seattle” campaign resulted in the elimination of 2.3 million disposable plastic straws in the month of September in that city.

Human Teeth Traced To Fish Scales, Cambridge Scientists Say

2017-11-21T15:59:46+00:00 November 21, 2017|

Teeth grew from the scales of primitive shark-like fish millions of years ago, research by scientists suggests. Old lineage cartilaginous fish like sharks, skates and rays that have skin which contained small spiky scales or "dermal denticles" may be the key, scientists say.

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 11-20-2017

2017-11-20T16:08:32+00:00 November 20, 2017|

It’s fairly easy to predict what will happen to the turkeys tomorrow at the traditional pardoning ceremony at the White House. It’s much more difficult to predict what will happen with our weather and climate in the months and years ahead, but one thing we do know is that ocean observations play a crucial role in [...]

House Floor Action: NDAA and Flood Insurance Reauthorization

2017-11-30T15:26:00+00:00 November 20, 2017|

The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (NDAA, H.R. 2810) passed the House (356-70) and Senate (by voice vote) this week. The 21st Century Flood Reform Act (H.R. 2874) passed the House (237-189). Activities of the U.S. military, ranging from understanding our ocean and providing disaster relief to enforcing laws and providing medical assistance, are authorized each year by the NDAA. Many provisions relate to the safety and security of our nation and our military, making this a must-pass bill that has been passed 55 years in a row.

Tax Reform: Graduate Student Tuition And ANWR Drilling

2017-11-30T15:25:28+00:00 November 20, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) Map of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). (Credit: USGS) What It Was Both chambers worked on tax reform bills, which are advancing through the budget reconciliation process. The House’s bill, Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (H.R. 1), passed the chamber along a largely party-line vote (227-205) and includes a provision [...]

Diversifying The STEM Workforce

2017-11-30T15:26:14+00:00 November 20, 2017|

The House Science, Space, and Technology Committee held a markup on four science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) bills (STEM Research and Education Effectiveness and Transparency Act (H.R. 4375), Supporting Veterans in STEM Careers Act (H.R. 4323), Women in Aerospace Education Act (H.R. 4254), and Building Blocks of STEM Act (H.R. 3397)) and on three bills promoting research at the Department of Energy (Department of Energy Research Infrastructure Act of 2017 (H.R. 4376), Accelerating American Leadership in Science Act of 2017 (H.R. 4377), and Nuclear Energy Research Infrastructure Act of 2017 (H.R. 4378)). All seven bills passed out of committee by voice vote.

Humans Have Cracked The Secrets Of Uncrackable Parrotfish Teeth

2017-11-17T18:36:44+00:00 November 17, 2017|

Have you ever dug your feet into the warm, soft surface of a white sand beach? Felt the fine, dry grains slide pleasurably between your toes? Thank a parrotfish. Specifically, thank it for its poop. Most of the sand on just about every white beach in the world is the product of generations of the strange family of fish digging their sturdy beaks into ocean-floor coral and chewing chunks of rocky organic matter down to powder. And now, researchers know how the swimming weirdos get through their stony meals without cracking their teeth.

Loss Of Protections For Marine Sanctuaries Could Threaten Oceanic Environment And Fisheries, Stanford Experts Say

2017-11-17T10:19:05+00:00 November 17, 2017|

The Trump administration is considering rolling back federal protections for a number of national monuments. While most are on land and relatively accessible, three are deep below the ocean’s surface and many miles from the mainland: the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument and the Rose Atoll Marine National Monument, both in the central Pacific Ocean, and the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument off the coast of New England. While most people will never explore the canyons and reefs of these watery realms, their value is hard to overestimate, according to Stanford scientists with years of experience exploring and studying these and adjacent areas.

Strategic Communications Consultant, Federal Fisheries Coalition

2017-11-16T14:11:06+00:00 November 16, 2017|

GENERAL SUMMARY A coalition of national organizations focused on defending America’s path to sustainable fisheries is seeking a communications professional to help advance our goals of healthy coastal communities, sustainable fisheries and a healthy ocean environment through smart fisheries management policies. The Ocean Foundation is the fiscal sponsor of the coalition, which is comprised of [...]

Member Highlight: Pacific Island Countries Could Lose 50-80 Percent Of Fish In Local Waters Under Climate Change

2017-11-16T09:14:24+00:00 November 16, 2017|

Many Pacific Island nations will lose 50 to 80 percent of marine species in their waters by the end of the 21st century if climate change continues unchecked, finds a new Nippon Foundation-Nereus Program study published in Marine Policy. This area of the ocean is projected to be the most severely impacted by aspects of climate change.

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