New Fish Species Lives 5 Miles Underwater—A Record

2017-12-04T15:47:36+00:00 December 4, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) (Credit: Adam Summers, Friday Harbor Lab, University Of Washington) Scientists have formally identified a new species of snailfish, the deepest ever caught in the Mariana Trench. A related species has been filmed but never collected. (From National Geographic/ By Craig Welch) — It’s cute, almost pink, and about [...]

Jellyfish On The Menu

2017-12-04T16:59:17+00:00 December 4, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) (Credit: University of East Anglia) Squid, sole, dogfish, herring and cod all feed on baby jellyfish – according to new research from the University of East Anglia and the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas). The moon jellyfish is commonly found around the coastlines of Britain. They’re [...]

Is NOAA One Step Closer To Having An Administrator?

2017-12-14T10:50:04+00:00 December 4, 2017|

(Credit: AccuWeather) What It Was The Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee held a nomination hearing to consider presidential nominee Mr. Barry Myers (CEO, AccuWeather, Inc.) to serve as the administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Why It Matters Executive leadership is vital to, implementing missions, executing projects, creating an organizational [...]

A Less Frozen Frontier

2017-12-14T11:16:32+00:00 December 4, 2017|

Northwest Passage (Credit: NASA) What It Was A coalition of geoscience organizations and Representative Don Young (AK-At-large) hosted a briefing in the Geosciences and the U.S. Economy Series titled, “Geosciences in the Artic: Permafrost, Energy, and Trade Routes in the Last Frontier.” Why It Matters The United States is an Arctic nation [...]

Why Are There No Sea Snakes In The Atlantic?

2017-12-04T16:58:35+00:00 November 30, 2017|

Sea snakes are an evolutionary success story. With about 70 species, they're the most diverse reptile group in the ocean, outnumbering sea turtle species 10-to-1. They sport a range of physical adaptations for life at sea, including a flattened oar-like tail for paddling and the abilities to smell underwater, hold their breath for hours and go for months without a drink. And although they're not powerful swimmers, they have spread throughout the Pacific and Indian Oceans, ranging from Japan to New Zealand and from South Africa to Central America.

A Model Explains Effects Like The Formation Of Clouds From The Sea

2017-12-04T17:37:40+00:00 November 30, 2017|

All liquids always contain gases in a greater or lesser concentration depending on the pressure and temperature to which it is subjected. These gases almost always end up as more or less small bubbles on the surface of the liquid. When these bubbles explode, especially if they are microscopic, minuscule drops are expelled at great velocity, and the drops almost instantly travel notable distances from the surface of the liquid that they came from.

Melting Ice Could Mess Up Deep-Sea Chemistry

2017-12-04T17:37:38+00:00 November 30, 2017|

Melting glaciers might be making ocean water more acidic, an unexpected finding that's given scientists new cause for concern. A new study published yesterday in the journal Nature Climate Change suggests surprising ways that climate change is drastically altering the water chemistry in deep seas—a process that may happen faster than researchers anticipated.

Climate Skeptic From Texas Moves Closer To Top Environment Post Under Trump

2017-11-30T12:56:54+00:00 November 30, 2017|

A Senate committee approved Kathleen Hartnett White, a climate change skeptic and former chairwoman of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, for a top environmental post Wednesday. Voting along party lines, the Senate’s Environment and Public Works committee approved White to head the Council on Environmental Quality. Her nomination must be approved by the full Senate before she is confirmed.

See What Happens At A ‘Day Spa’ For Whales

2017-12-04T17:37:28+00:00 November 28, 2017|

To graduate student Sarah Fortune, the rocky crags off Baffin Island were just part of its stark beauty. Then, she saw a group of eight bowhead whales rubbing their bodies against the large boulders. Using aerial drones to watch the whales, she saw that they were using the rocks to help remove loose, dead skin.

Antarctic Glacier’s Rough Belly Exposed

2017-11-28T16:54:45+00:00 November 28, 2017|

The melting Antarctic ice stream that is currently adding most to sea-level rise may be more resilient to change than previously recognized. New radar images reveal the mighty Pine Island Glacier (PIG) to be sitting on a rugged rock bed populated by big hills, tall cliffs and deep scour marks.

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