South Africa Tackles Crime At Sea With Ship-Spotting Satellites

2017-11-14T17:53:28+00:00 November 14, 2017|

In October last year, a fishing boat set out from Velddrif, a small town on South Africa’s west coast. It sailed northwest for about 25 nautical miles (46 kilometres), then turned sharply and headed back the way it had come. Staying clear of coastal settlements, it entered the West Coast National Park marine protected area — a strictly no-fishing zone — where it slowed down and began to sail in a zigzag pattern. “It was obvious what they were doing,” says Niel Malan, a marine biologist who works in South Africa’s Department of Environmental Affairs in Cape Town. “They were poaching.”

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 11-13-2017

2017-11-13T17:14:09+00:00 November 13, 2017|

A new paper published in Nature Communications serves as an excellent reminder of the long-term value of ocean research and data collection.  This paper provides the first holistic analysis of the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS), which is a legacy of the Census of Marine Life – a global initiative that COL managed for a [...]

For Seagrass, Biodiversity Is Both A Goal And A Means For Restoration

2017-11-09T11:19:34+00:00 November 9, 2017|

Coral reefs, seagrass meadows and mangrove forests work together to make the Coral Triangle of Indonesia a hotspot for marine biodiversity. The system supports valuable fisheries and endangered species and helps protect shorelines. But it is in global decline due to threats from coastal development, destructive fishing practices and climate change.

Member Highlight: How Wind Might Nudge A Sleeping Giant In Antarctica

2017-11-07T14:15:52+00:00 November 7, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) Research plane over Totten Glacier. (Credit: Image courtesy of Imperial College London) Scientists believe they’ve identified a key process affecting the melting of an enormous glacier in East Antarctica, bigger than the state of California. And the effects may only worsen with future climate change. (From Scientific American / by [...]

Killer Gas Aids Elephant Seals’ Deep Dives

2017-11-07T14:10:02+00:00 November 7, 2017|

Colorless, odorless, and potentially lethal, carbon monoxide is so feared by people that we have special monitors in our homes to detect it. But its accumulation in the blood helps elephant seals make deep dives in the ocean, researchers reported here last week at the biennial meeting of the Marine Mammal Society. Aside from helping explain how elephant seals can stay so deep for so long, the work could one day help people recover from traumatic events like heart attacks and organ transplants.

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 11-06-2017

2017-11-06T17:31:46+00:00 November 6, 2017|

On Friday, I was pleased to see that the administration released the latest Climate Science Special Report, an 800-page examination of the state of climate science that is the first of two volumes of the Fourth National Climate Assessment. This extremely important report represents a Herculean task that involved scientists from multiple federal agencies (including [...]

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