Jon White – From the President’s Office: 11-27-2017

2017-11-27T16:12:56+00:00 November 27, 2017|

As you recover from a hopefully restful period of giving thanks and feasting, I hope you are getting ready to join the National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB) for the third biggest giving day of the year - #GivingTuesday. Each year, the NOSB features a theme that is both timely and regionally significant to the Finals [...]

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 11-20-2017

2017-11-20T16:08:32+00:00 November 20, 2017|

It’s fairly easy to predict what will happen to the turkeys tomorrow at the traditional pardoning ceremony at the White House. It’s much more difficult to predict what will happen with our weather and climate in the months and years ahead, but one thing we do know is that ocean observations play a crucial role in [...]

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 11-13-2017

2017-11-13T17:14:09+00:00 November 13, 2017|

A new paper published in Nature Communications serves as an excellent reminder of the long-term value of ocean research and data collection.  This paper provides the first holistic analysis of the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS), which is a legacy of the Census of Marine Life – a global initiative that COL managed for a [...]

Member Highlight: How Wind Might Nudge A Sleeping Giant In Antarctica

2017-11-07T14:15:52+00:00 November 7, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) Research plane over Totten Glacier. (Credit: Image courtesy of Imperial College London) Scientists believe they’ve identified a key process affecting the melting of an enormous glacier in East Antarctica, bigger than the state of California. And the effects may only worsen with future climate change. (From Scientific American / by [...]

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 11-06-2017

2017-11-06T17:31:46+00:00 November 6, 2017|

On Friday, I was pleased to see that the administration released the latest Climate Science Special Report, an 800-page examination of the state of climate science that is the first of two volumes of the Fourth National Climate Assessment. This extremely important report represents a Herculean task that involved scientists from multiple federal agencies (including [...]

Member Highlight: Chukchi Mooring Returns A Year Of pH Data

2017-11-06T15:52:06+00:00 November 6, 2017|

(Click to enlarge). The Chukchi Ecosystem Observatory is maintained by a multi-institutional, multi-investigator partnership that includes the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Alaska Ocean Observing System, the North Pacific Research Board, Olgoonik-Fairweather, Université Laval, and the University of Washington. On a recent research mission, University of Alaska Fairbanks scientists brought home the first [...]

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 10-30-2017

2017-10-30T17:02:48+00:00 October 30, 2017|

Last week, COL convened our third annual industry forum, bringing together more than 100 cross-sector stakeholders invested in this year’s topic, Rigs to Reality: Determining the Fate of Offshore Oil Platforms. While participants represented a wide spectrum of interests, from oil companies to government agencies to environmental organizations to academic institutions, all had a shared [...]

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 10-23-2017

2017-10-24T12:25:25+00:00 October 23, 2017|

You may have heard of speed dating, but how about speed mentoring? I was honored to be asked to participate in a speed mentoring event with D.C.’s Women’s Aquatic Network WAN) last Wednesday. While it was rewarding (and exhausting) to impart my perspective and advice to 14 developing ocean leaders in 70 minutes, I was also inspired [...]

Member Highlight: Melting Glaciers Could Raise Sea Levels In Sharp Bursts, Reef Fossils Show

2017-10-24T12:15:52+00:00 October 23, 2017|

If all the land ice present on Earth today were to melt, it would raise the global sea levels by about 70 meters (230 feet), according to the United States Geological Survey. Under the onslaught of global warming, sea levels have been rising steadily in the recent years, but researchers looking at historical data have found these rise could happen in sharp bursts instead.

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 10-16-2017

2017-10-24T12:44:58+00:00 October 16, 2017|

As the news about hurricane-induced damage and devastation to islands and coasts of the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico continues to unfold, the fires in the forests of California provide another heartbreaking reminder of our fragility and susceptibility to our environment. Any time we experience natural disasters such as these, part of [...]

Independent Science Review, Gulf Of Mexico Ecosystem Restoration Council

2017-10-16T13:54:33+00:00 October 16, 2017|

The Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council invites you to engage in the independent science review of Gulf of Mexico ecosystem restoration projects and programs being considered for funding by the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council (the Council) that was created as part of the Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities, and Revived Economies of the Gulf Coast [...]

Member Highlight: Research In The Arctic: Discovering Changes In The Ecosystem

2018-01-02T13:51:54+00:00 October 16, 2017|

Arctic research has been ongoing for several decades, yet there is still a clear need for additional studies to better understand the processes driving the Arctic marine ecosystem as a whole—even more so as Arctic sea ice continues to retreat at an increasing rate. Changes in sea ice timing, presence, extent, or thickness will have profound influences on coastal communities, marine mammals, seabirds, fishes, plankton, and oceanography.

Member Highlight: Research In The Arctic: Discovering Changes In The Ecosystem

2017-10-16T11:47:32+00:00 October 16, 2017|

Arctic research has been ongoing for several decades, yet there is still a clear need for additional studies to better understand the processes driving the Arctic marine ecosystem as a whole—even more so as Arctic sea ice continues to retreat at an increasing rate. Changes in sea ice timing, presence, extent, or thickness will have profound influences on coastal communities, marine mammals, seabirds, fishes, plankton, and oceanography.

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 10-9-2017

2017-10-24T12:49:28+00:00 October 10, 2017|

Some good news about the ocean you have missed last week amidst the prevailing current events: Vulcan Inc. committed $40 million to develop and deploy SkyLight, a near real-time illegal fishing intelligence and research program. Malta announced the introduction of a beverage container refund scheme by 2019 to ensure 70% of plastic bottles generated on its [...]

Member Highlight: Fueling The Future

2018-01-02T13:52:04+00:00 October 10, 2017|

A group of Jackson School scientists and students embark on a high-stakes research mission. Standing on the helideck of the Helix Q4000 with nothing but waves in sight, Peter Flemings is bleary eyed and exhausted. But, for this moment at least, the Jackson School of Geosciences professor and chief scientist of the coring mission is relieved and something akin to happy. The scene marks a seminal moment in a ground-breaking project, an $80-million, multi-year national effort that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) picked the Jackson School to lead. Flemings and his team have finally hit pay dirt, pulling a core of frozen methane hydrate from about 1,300 feet under the Gulf floor, through a mile of water, and to the deck of the deep-water coring vessel, while still keeping the methane hydrate under pressure.

Member Highlight: Fueling The Future

2017-10-10T12:59:21+00:00 October 10, 2017|

A group of Jackson School scientists and students embark on a high-stakes research mission. Standing on the helideck of the Helix Q4000 with nothing but waves in sight, Peter Flemings is bleary eyed and exhausted. But, for this moment at least, the Jackson School of Geosciences professor and chief scientist of the coring mission is relieved and something akin to happy. The scene marks a seminal moment in a ground-breaking project, an $80-million, multi-year national effort that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) picked the Jackson School to lead. Flemings and his team have finally hit pay dirt, pulling a core of frozen methane hydrate from about 1,300 feet under the Gulf floor, through a mile of water, and to the deck of the deep-water coring vessel, while still keeping the methane hydrate under pressure.

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 10-2-2017

2017-10-24T12:49:38+00:00 October 2, 2017|

Last week, I had the chance to take a behind-the-scenes tour of our nation’s Capitol. Staring up at the Apotheosis of Washington  underneath the Capitol dome from the rotunda, I was struck by the six groups of figures surrounding the perimeter of the painting, representing the principle values of the U.S. as understood at the time it [...]

Jon White – From The President’s Office: 09-25-2017

2017-09-25T16:19:59+00:00 September 25, 2017|

You’ve heard about Alaska’s Gold Rush, but what about Alaska’s “Blue Rush?” I used this term during a panel I was on last week at MTS/IEEE’s OCEANS ‘17, which brought together hundreds of attendees from ocean technology industries, academic institutions, and government agencies focused around ocean science and technology. As I’ve written of before, I [...]

Trump Sets Record With Delay In Nominating Administrator

2017-09-21T11:45:46+00:00 September 21, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) The U.S. Capital at night. (Credit: Will Ramos) It's official: Donald Trump has waited longer than any president in history to pick a NOAA administrator. Trump yesterday broke the record set by Republican President George W. Bush, who delayed his decision until Sept. 19, 2001, when he nominated former Navy Vice [...]

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 9-18-2017

2017-09-18T15:00:28+00:00 September 18, 2017|

As we consider means to ensure the ocean’s health, sustainability, and productivity, I am repeatedly reminded that innovation (on the scale we need for the ocean) must be a team sport. This was exemplified last week by a panel of ocean innovators who I had the honor of moderating during a Senate Ocean Caucus briefing on [...]

Member Highlight: How Openings In Antarctic Sea Ice Affect Worldwide Climate

2017-09-14T11:38:37+00:00 September 14, 2017|

In 1974, images acquired from NOAA satellites revealed a puzzling phenomenon: a 250,000 square kilometer opening in the winter sea ice in the Weddell Sea, south of South America. The opening, known as a polynya, persisted over three winters. Such expansive ice-free areas in the ocean surrounding Antarctica have not been seen since, though a small polynya was seen last year.

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 9-11-2017

2017-09-11T17:40:50+00:00 September 11, 2017|

It’s been hard to stay away from the news and all of my favorite weather geek websites as the second major hurricane in three weeks made landfall in the U.S. My thoughts are with everyone in my home state as Florida continues to weather this catastrophic storm. Several of our member institutions were severely impacted by [...]

Member Highlight: Liquid Robotics Debuts Next Generation Wave Glider

2017-09-11T10:59:26+00:00 September 11, 2017|

Long-duration unmanned surface vehicles manufacturer Liquid Robotics has rolled out its next generation Wave Glider, featuring advancements to the platform’s operational range, and performance for missions in high sea states and high latitudes. Other updates include advancements for expanded sensor payloads and increased energy and storage capacity required for long duration maritime surveillance, environmental monitoring and observation missions.

Trump Picks Scientist Who Accepts Warming For NOAA Role

2017-09-07T11:58:27+00:00 September 7, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) Global warming in the USA (Credit: Andrea Della Adriano/Flickr) There is something unusual about the Trump administration's appointment of NOAA's new deputy administrator: He believes climate change is real. Tim Gallaudet was nominated to be deputy administrator at NOAA last week. He will take the No. 2 slot at the agency [...]

President And CEO RADM Jon White (Ret.): Our Nation’s Economy, Health, And Security Benefit From Federal Investments In Basic And Early-Stage Research

2018-08-28T14:05:51+00:00 September 6, 2017|

(Washington, D.C.) – In response to Congress’ consideration of H.R. 3354, the Make America Secure and Prosperous Appropriations Act, 2018, on the House floor this week, Rear Admiral (Ret.) Jonathan White, president and CEO of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership, submitted the following letter to House Appropriations Committee leadership. “As the House considers H.R. [...]

Ocean Warming In Antarctic Triggers Surprising Changes, Study Shows

2017-09-06T12:02:18+00:00 September 6, 2017|

A single degree of warming in the shallow waters off the Antarctic Peninsula could significantly benefit some species at the expense of others, a new study has found. In what is claimed to be the "most realistic ocean warming experiment to date" researchers placed heated panels on the sea floor and monitored the growth of sediment-dwelling species on the panels over nine months. While the panels only warmed the water a few millimetres above the panel surface, it was enough to trigger major changes in the seabed communities, the scientists reported in the journal Current Biology.

Trump Taps Former Navy Scientist To Be NOAA’s Second In Command

2017-09-02T11:52:04+00:00 September 2, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) NOAA Logo (Credit: NOAA) President Donald Trump nominated former Navy oceanographer and Rear Adm. Timothy Gallaudet for the number two spot at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Friday, according to a White House statement. (The Daily Caller, Tim Pearce) -- The 32-year Navy veteran will serve as the assistant secretary [...]

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 8-7-2017

2017-08-07T17:17:45+00:00 August 7, 2017|

Two weeks ago during my stay on the Gulf Coast, I had the opportunity to visit several of COL’s members: Louisiana University Marine Consortium (LUMCON), Louisiana State University (LSU) College of Coast and Environment, Dauphin Island Sea Lab, and the University of Southern Mississippi (USM) School of Ocean Science and Technology. I strongly encourage you to look again at [...]

Member Highlight: Ecosystem Cascades Affecting Salmon

2017-08-07T11:50:02+00:00 August 7, 2017|

Interpreting relationships between species and their environments is crucial to inform ecosystem-based management (EBM), a priority for NOAA Fisheries. EBM recognizes the diverse interactions within an ecosystem -- including human impacts -- so NOAA Fisheries can consider resource tradeoffs that help protect and sustain productive ecosystems and the services they provide. In the coastal ocean of California -- seabird predators, forage fish on which they feed, and the survival of salmon out-migrating to sea are each of particular interest, and an improved understanding of their interactions could in turn improve the management of the ocean ecosystem.

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 7-31-2017

2017-07-31T16:23:54+00:00 July 31, 2017|

Last Thursday, I attended the Navy change of command ceremony for the Navy Meteorology and Oceanography Command at Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, where Rear Admiral Tim Gallaudet was relieved by Rear Admiral John Okon. Gallaudet, who will retire at the end of August, is an amazing leader and oceanographer, and I predict we will continue to see [...]

Member Highlight: A New Model Yields Insights Into Glaciers’ Retreats And Advances

2018-01-02T13:54:31+00:00 July 31, 2017|

A University of Alaska Fairbanks study looking at the physics of tidewater glaciers has yielded new insights into what drives their retreat-and-advance cycles and the role that climate plays in these cycles. Lead author and UAF geophysics doctoral student Douglas Brinkerhoff said the study in Nature Communications reveals that shifting sediments drive the cycles among tidewater glaciers in temperate climates such as southern Alaska.

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 7-24-2017

2017-07-24T16:44:32+00:00 July 24, 2017|

The Arctic is a region of growing importance, and most COL members, along with many federal agencies, have extensive ocean science interests in the area. At last week’s 7th Symposium on the Impacts of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic on Naval and Maritime Operations, speakers highlighted the spectrum of national and international issues in the region, from national security [...]

Polar Bears And People: Cataloging Conflict

2017-07-20T16:26:21+00:00 July 20, 2017|

ON WILLIAM BARENTS’S second Arctic expedition in 1595, the Dutch navigator’s crew had a deadly encounter. While searching for diamonds on an islet near Russia’s Vaygach Island three months into the journey, two of his sailors were resting in a wind-protected depression when “a great leane beare came sodainly stealing out, and caught one of them fast by the necke.” The bear killed and devoured both men, despite the crew’s attempt to drive the animal away. The incident, recounted in Dutch officer Gerrit de Veer’s diary, became the first account of a polar bear attacking humans in recorded history.

Coast Guard Makes Dire Warning About Drilling In The Arctic

2017-07-19T14:00:29+00:00 July 19, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) WHOI and the University of Delaware  Ocean Drilling Program. (Courtesy of the Ocean Drilling Program) For months now America's climate denying president, Donald Trump, has been maneuvering to open up the Arctic to oil drilling, in another act of defiance against his predecessor, Barack Obama. Back in April, Trump signed an executive order to extend offshore [...]

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