…of the physical, biological and chemical properties of the ocean critical to supporting life on the planet.

Member Highlight: How Wind Might Nudge A Sleeping Giant In Antarctica

2017-11-07T14:15:52+00:00 November 7, 2017|

(Click to enlarge) Research plane over Totten Glacier. (Credit: Image courtesy of Imperial College London) Scientists believe they’ve identified a key process affecting the melting of an enormous glacier in East Antarctica, bigger than the state of California. And the effects may only worsen with future climate change. (From Scientific American / by [...]

Member Highlight: Chukchi Mooring Returns A Year Of pH Data

2017-11-06T15:52:06+00:00 November 6, 2017|

(Click to enlarge). The Chukchi Ecosystem Observatory is maintained by a multi-institutional, multi-investigator partnership that includes the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Alaska Ocean Observing System, the North Pacific Research Board, Olgoonik-Fairweather, Université Laval, and the University of Washington. On a recent research mission, University of Alaska Fairbanks scientists brought home the first [...]

Member Highlight: Melting Glaciers Could Raise Sea Levels In Sharp Bursts, Reef Fossils Show

2017-10-24T12:15:52+00:00 October 23, 2017|

If all the land ice present on Earth today were to melt, it would raise the global sea levels by about 70 meters (230 feet), according to the United States Geological Survey. Under the onslaught of global warming, sea levels have been rising steadily in the recent years, but researchers looking at historical data have found these rise could happen in sharp bursts instead.

Independent Science Review, Gulf Of Mexico Ecosystem Restoration Council

2017-10-16T13:54:33+00:00 October 16, 2017|

The Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council invites you to engage in the independent science review of Gulf of Mexico ecosystem restoration projects and programs being considered for funding by the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council (the Council) that was created as part of the Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities, and Revived Economies of the Gulf Coast [...]

Member Highlight: Research In The Arctic: Discovering Changes In The Ecosystem

2018-01-02T13:51:54+00:00 October 16, 2017|

Arctic research has been ongoing for several decades, yet there is still a clear need for additional studies to better understand the processes driving the Arctic marine ecosystem as a whole—even more so as Arctic sea ice continues to retreat at an increasing rate. Changes in sea ice timing, presence, extent, or thickness will have profound influences on coastal communities, marine mammals, seabirds, fishes, plankton, and oceanography.

Member Highlight: Research In The Arctic: Discovering Changes In The Ecosystem

2017-10-16T11:47:32+00:00 October 16, 2017|

Arctic research has been ongoing for several decades, yet there is still a clear need for additional studies to better understand the processes driving the Arctic marine ecosystem as a whole—even more so as Arctic sea ice continues to retreat at an increasing rate. Changes in sea ice timing, presence, extent, or thickness will have profound influences on coastal communities, marine mammals, seabirds, fishes, plankton, and oceanography.

Member Highlight: Fueling The Future

2018-01-02T13:52:04+00:00 October 10, 2017|

A group of Jackson School scientists and students embark on a high-stakes research mission. Standing on the helideck of the Helix Q4000 with nothing but waves in sight, Peter Flemings is bleary eyed and exhausted. But, for this moment at least, the Jackson School of Geosciences professor and chief scientist of the coring mission is relieved and something akin to happy. The scene marks a seminal moment in a ground-breaking project, an $80-million, multi-year national effort that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) picked the Jackson School to lead. Flemings and his team have finally hit pay dirt, pulling a core of frozen methane hydrate from about 1,300 feet under the Gulf floor, through a mile of water, and to the deck of the deep-water coring vessel, while still keeping the methane hydrate under pressure.

Member Highlight: Fueling The Future

2017-10-10T12:59:21+00:00 October 10, 2017|

A group of Jackson School scientists and students embark on a high-stakes research mission. Standing on the helideck of the Helix Q4000 with nothing but waves in sight, Peter Flemings is bleary eyed and exhausted. But, for this moment at least, the Jackson School of Geosciences professor and chief scientist of the coring mission is relieved and something akin to happy. The scene marks a seminal moment in a ground-breaking project, an $80-million, multi-year national effort that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) picked the Jackson School to lead. Flemings and his team have finally hit pay dirt, pulling a core of frozen methane hydrate from about 1,300 feet under the Gulf floor, through a mile of water, and to the deck of the deep-water coring vessel, while still keeping the methane hydrate under pressure.

Member Highlight: How Openings In Antarctic Sea Ice Affect Worldwide Climate

2017-09-14T11:38:37+00:00 September 14, 2017|

In 1974, images acquired from NOAA satellites revealed a puzzling phenomenon: a 250,000 square kilometer opening in the winter sea ice in the Weddell Sea, south of South America. The opening, known as a polynya, persisted over three winters. Such expansive ice-free areas in the ocean surrounding Antarctica have not been seen since, though a small polynya was seen last year.

Member Highlight: Liquid Robotics Debuts Next Generation Wave Glider

2017-09-11T10:59:26+00:00 September 11, 2017|

Long-duration unmanned surface vehicles manufacturer Liquid Robotics has rolled out its next generation Wave Glider, featuring advancements to the platform’s operational range, and performance for missions in high sea states and high latitudes. Other updates include advancements for expanded sensor payloads and increased energy and storage capacity required for long duration maritime surveillance, environmental monitoring and observation missions.

Ocean Warming In Antarctic Triggers Surprising Changes, Study Shows

2017-09-06T12:02:18+00:00 September 6, 2017|

A single degree of warming in the shallow waters off the Antarctic Peninsula could significantly benefit some species at the expense of others, a new study has found. In what is claimed to be the "most realistic ocean warming experiment to date" researchers placed heated panels on the sea floor and monitored the growth of sediment-dwelling species on the panels over nine months. While the panels only warmed the water a few millimetres above the panel surface, it was enough to trigger major changes in the seabed communities, the scientists reported in the journal Current Biology.

Member Highlight: Ecosystem Cascades Affecting Salmon

2017-08-07T11:50:02+00:00 August 7, 2017|

Interpreting relationships between species and their environments is crucial to inform ecosystem-based management (EBM), a priority for NOAA Fisheries. EBM recognizes the diverse interactions within an ecosystem -- including human impacts -- so NOAA Fisheries can consider resource tradeoffs that help protect and sustain productive ecosystems and the services they provide. In the coastal ocean of California -- seabird predators, forage fish on which they feed, and the survival of salmon out-migrating to sea are each of particular interest, and an improved understanding of their interactions could in turn improve the management of the ocean ecosystem.

Member Highlight: A New Model Yields Insights Into Glaciers’ Retreats And Advances

2018-01-02T13:54:31+00:00 July 31, 2017|

A University of Alaska Fairbanks study looking at the physics of tidewater glaciers has yielded new insights into what drives their retreat-and-advance cycles and the role that climate plays in these cycles. Lead author and UAF geophysics doctoral student Douglas Brinkerhoff said the study in Nature Communications reveals that shifting sediments drive the cycles among tidewater glaciers in temperate climates such as southern Alaska.

Polar Bears And People: Cataloging Conflict

2017-07-20T16:26:21+00:00 July 20, 2017|

ON WILLIAM BARENTS’S second Arctic expedition in 1595, the Dutch navigator’s crew had a deadly encounter. While searching for diamonds on an islet near Russia’s Vaygach Island three months into the journey, two of his sailors were resting in a wind-protected depression when “a great leane beare came sodainly stealing out, and caught one of them fast by the necke.” The bear killed and devoured both men, despite the crew’s attempt to drive the animal away. The incident, recounted in Dutch officer Gerrit de Veer’s diary, became the first account of a polar bear attacking humans in recorded history.

Member Highlight: Researchers Find Coral Reefs In A Place They Shouldn’t Exist

2017-07-18T16:05:29+00:00 July 18, 2017|

While the waters of the North Atlantic and South Pacific tend to have what hard corals need to survive, the North Pacific doesn't, and it has been thought that deep-sea coral reefs were a near impossibility in that part of the ocean. But researchers at Florida State University and Texas A&M University have discovered a few reefs in the North Pacific that don't seem to be following the rules. Their findings were recently published in Scientific Reports.

Member Highlight: FAU Harbor Branch Leads Exploration Of Cuba’s Deep Coral Reefs

2018-01-02T13:55:03+00:00 July 17, 2017|

The Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research, and Technology (CIOERT), based at FAU Harbor Branch, recently led a collaborative scientific expedition to Cuba, exploring never-before-studied mesophotic coral reefs from 30 m to 150 m. After nearly a year and half of planning, the research cruise, "Cuba's Twilight Zone Reefs and Their Regional Connectivity," circumnavigated Cuba in just one month.

National Science Foundation Statement On Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) Array Removal

2017-07-06T13:00:12+00:00 July 6, 2017|

Dear Colleagues: As part of its continuing commitment to ensuring the most efficient use of its resources, and consistent with recommendations in the National Academy of Sciences’ 2015 report “Sea Change: Decadal Survey of Ocean Sciences 2015-2025”, the Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) is working with the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) to focus the [...]

Member Highlight: The Beach Time Capsule

2017-06-29T09:32:55+00:00 June 29, 2017|

And to think it was all right there in her garage. A load of boxes pulled from biologist Dale Straughan's home yielded a veritable treasure trove for UC Santa Barbara researchers studying the impact of climate change on coastal biodiversity in California.

Sea Sponges Stay Put With Anchors That Bend But Don’t Break

2017-06-26T10:08:28+00:00 June 26, 2017|

Sea sponges known as Venus' flower baskets remain fixed to the sea floor with nothing more than an array of thin, hair-like anchors made essentially of glass. It's an important job, and new research suggests that it's the internal architecture of those anchors, known as basalia spicules, that helps them to do it. The spicules, each about half the diameter of a human hair, are made of a central silica (glass) core clad within 25 thin silica cylinders. Viewed in cross-section, the arrangement looks like the rings in a tree trunk. The new study by researchers in Brown University's School of Engineering shows that compared to spicules taken from a different sponge species that lacks the tree-ring architecture, the basalia spicules are able to bend up to 2.4 times further before breaking.

Member Highlight: Toxic Mercury Levels Are Actually Declining In Alaskan Polar Bears—But That’s Not As Great As It Sounds

2018-01-02T13:55:29+00:00 June 19, 2017|

Imagine: vast expanses of frozen sea, stretching from the northern coast of Alaska into the Arctic horizon. Welcome to the Southern Beaufort Sea—or at least, the Southern Beaufort Sea as it used to be. This icy Arctic ecosystem is dominated by the majestic polar bear, but warmer temperatures are changing both the landscape and its inhabitants. In a recent study in Polar Research, scientists at the University of Connecticut and the United States Geological Survey found that mercury levels measured in Southern Beaufort polar bears' hair have actually declined significantly in recent years, particularly in male polar bears. Surprisingly, despite worries about increasing pollution, mercury levels dropped by about 13 percent per year in samples collected from 2004 to 2011. The decrease was insignificant in female bears (4.4 percent), but much higher in male bears (15 percent). “We see this very substantial drop in polar bear mercury concentration over a relatively short period of time,” says Melissa McKinney, first author of the study and assistant professor at the University of Connecticut.

Member Highlight: COL Welcomes New Member, Shell Oil Company

2017-06-12T16:50:11+00:00 June 12, 2017|

Shell Oil Company is an affiliate of the Royal Dutch Shell plc, a global group of energy and petrochemical companies with operations in more than 70 countries. In the U.S., Shell operates in 50 states and employs more than 20,000 people working to help tackle the challenges of the new energy future. Shell is no stranger to the priorities and focus of COL. Over the last two years, Dr. Ruth Perry, Marine and Regulatory Specialist at Shell and Shell’s COL member representative, has served on COL’s Industry Forum Advisory Committee to facilitate framing the forum in a manner that supports robust, constructive, and outcomes-focused discussion on pressing science questions at the intersection of ocean research, industry, and stewardship.

A Foundation For Greatness Must Include Investing In Our Future

2018-08-28T14:03:22+00:00 May 23, 2017|

(Washington, D.C.) – The following statement was issued by Rear Admiral (Ret.) Jonathan White, President and CEO of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership, in response to cuts to federal Earth and ocean science, as well as grant programs, in President Trump’s Fiscal Year 2018 budget request, “A New Foundation for American Greatness.” “Greatness isn’t [...]

Jon White – From the President’s Office: 5-22-2017

2017-05-22T16:20:48+00:00 May 22, 2017|

Today, the NOAA Corps turns 100. I was honored to be MC at their 100th anniversary event in Washington, D.C this past Saturday. One of our nation’s seven uniformed services, NOAA Corps’ work at sea, in the air, and on the ground over the last century has ensured the safety, security, and prosperity of our [...]

Load More Posts