Captain Cook’s Detailed 1778 Records Confirm Global Warming Today In The Arctic

2016-12-01T10:46:55+00:00 December 1, 2016|
Satellite image of the M'Clure Strait in the route of the Northwest Passage. (Credit: NASA Earth Observatory)

(Click to enlarge) Satellite image of the M’Clure Strait in the route of the Northwest Passage. (Credit: NASA Earth Observatory)

Passengers simmered in Jacuzzis and feasted on gourmet cuisine this summer as the 850-foot cruise ship Crystal Serenity moved through the Northwest Passage.

(From Phys.org)– But in the summer of 1778, when Capt. James Cook tried to find a Western entrance to the route, his men toiled on frost-slicked decks and complained about having to supplement dwindling rations with walrus meat.

The British expedition was halted north of the Bering Strait by “ice which was as compact as a wall and seemed to be 10 or 12 feet high at least,” according to the captain’s journal. Cook’s ships followed the ice edge all the way to Siberia in their futile search for an opening, sometimes guided through fog by the braying of the unpalatable creatures the crew called Sea Horses.

More than two centuries later, scientists are mining meticulous records kept by Cook and his crew for a new perspective on the warming that has opened the Arctic in a way the 18th century explorer could never have imagined.

Working with maps and logs from Cook’s voyage and other historical records and satellite imagery, University of Washington mathematician Harry Stern has tracked changes in in the Chukchi Sea, between Alaska and Russia, over nearly 240 years.

The results, published this month in the journal Polar Geography, confirm the significant shrinkage of the summer ice cap and shed new light on the timing of the transformation. The analysis also extends the historical picture back nearly 75 years, building on previous work with ships’ records from the 1850s.

“This old data helps us look at what conditions were like before we started , and what the natural variability was,” said Jim Overland, a Seattle-based oceanographer for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration who was not involved in Stern’s project.

Read the full article here: http://phys.org/news/2016-11-captain-cook-global-today-arctic.html#jCp