Anglers’ Gear, Cooperation Affect Coral Reef Fisheries

2016-01-20T12:40:37+00:00 January 14, 2016|
Coral reef ecosystem at Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. (Credit: Jim Maragos/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

(Click to enlarge) Coral reef ecosystem at Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. (Credit: Jim Maragos/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

Dartmouth College and University of California, Santa Barbara scientists studying a Caribbean fishing village are shedding new light on the social and ecological factors pressuring coral reef fisheries around the world.

(From Science Daily) — The research appears in the journals Marine Policy and Ambio.

Marine ecosystems around the world, including small-scale fisheries, are suffering from overfishing. This trend has hurt coral reef ecosystems, where fish species play critical roles in maintaining coral health and abundance. Of particular importance are herbivorous fish that eat macroalgae that overtake reefs if not kept in check. Small-scale fisheries employ 50 million of the world’s 51 million fishermen and are responsible for more than half of the annual marine catches around the globe. The majority are in developing countries where limited resources and a local dependence on fishing make effective management difficult.

Read the full article here: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160108200932.htm